Friday, December 17, 1971

Wright Brothers Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4097 - 85 Stat. 958

Proclamation 4097 of December 10, 1971

Wright Brothers Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The history of man is filled with dreams of flying. Throughout the ages, his fascination with the speed and grace of birds soaring through the skies led man to wish that he, too, might master the secrets of flight.

On December 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright answered this wish when they made the first successful flight in a heavier-than-air, mechanically propelled airplane.

Although that first flight lasted only twelve seconds, it freed man from the bonds which since his first step had held him to the earth. In that one flight across 120 feet of North Carolina sand, man caught hold of what before had been a mere dream—though our oldest and most daring dream. No matter what progress is made in our ability to fly through the air and the heavens, that first flight will always mark an epic moment in the history of man.

To commemorate the achievements of the Wright Brothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution of December 17, 1963 (77 Stat. 402), designated the seventeenth day of December of each year as Wright Brothers Day and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation inviting the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of this Nation, and their local and National Government officials, to observe Wright Brothers Day, December 17, 1971, with appropriate ceremonies and activities, both to recall the accomplishments of the Wright Brothers and to provide a stimulus to aviation in this country and throughout the world.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, December 10, 1971

Human Rights Day Bill of Rights Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4096 - 85 Stat. 957

Proclamation 4096 of December 9, 1971

Human Rights Day
Bill of Rights Day

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The Bill of Rights has served for 180 years as the basic guarantee of the rights and freedoms of the people of the United States. These rights and freedoms are fundamental to the dignity and worth of every person.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations General Assembly is in the tradition of our Constitution and its Bill of Rights. This Declaration, dating from December 10, 1948, is a statement of principle that represents the hopes of people on every continent, and that provides the nations of the world with a target to strive toward. Both the Bill of Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights rest on the proposition that each person has rights which are his own, and that protection of these rights is the foundation of freedom and justice.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim December 10, 1971, as Human Rights Day and December 15, 1971, as Bill of Rights Day. I call upon the people of the United States of America to observe the week beginning December 10, 1971, as Human Rights Week. In 1971 let us recall the framework of freedom that we established in 1791. Through our commitment to justice and equal opportunity for all in our own nation, we can give strength and meaning to the hopes of the people of all nations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Thursday, November 25, 1971

Thanksgiving Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4093 - 85 Stat. 953

Proclamation 4093 of November 5, 1971

Thanksgiving Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

One of the splendid events which shape man's destiny occurred when a small band of people, believing in the essential sanctity of their own being, went in search of a land in which their individuality might be the highest national value, before any arbitrary limitation or duty placed upon some men by the whim or design of others.

They went in search of a land where they might live out their own commitment to their own ideal of human freedom. In the purpose of their search, the human spirit found its ultimate definition, and in the product of their search, its ultimate expression. They found the land they sought, and it was a difficult land, but it was rich. With their sacrifices they brought forth its riches, and laid the foundation for a new nation.

But more than that, they revealed a new possibility for the expression of man's spirit. In the sure unfolding of that possibility man has begun to experience a world in which he may do justice, love mercy and walk humbly with his God forever.

For what those early settlers established, we give thanks in a way which began with them. In their first years on the hard cold edge of man's bright golden dream, they were tried and their faith was tested. But when their bodies failed, their faith did not.

The stark simple words on a sarcophagus in a little village on the seacoast of Massachusetts tell the story well: "This monument marks the first burying-ground in Plymouth of the passengers of the Mayflower. Here, under cover of darkness, the fast dwindling company laid their dead; leveling the earth above them lest the Indians should learn how many were the graves."

Yet, because mankind was not created merely to survive, in the face of all hardship and suffering, these men and women—and those of the other early settlements—prevailed. And the settlers gathered to give thanks for God's bounty, for the blessings of life itself, and for the freedom which they so cherished that no hardship could quench it. And now their heritage is ours.

What they dared to imagine for this land came to pass.

What they planted here prospered.

And for our heritage—a land rich with the bountiful blessings of God, and the freedom to enjoy those rich blessings—we give thanks to God Almighty in this time, and for all time.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, in accordance with the wish of the Congress as expressed in Section 6103 of Title 5 of the United States Code, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 25, 1971, as a day of national thanksgiving. I call upon all Americans to share this day, to give thanks in homes and in places of worship for the many blessings our people enjoy, to welcome the elderly and less fortunate as special participants in this day's festivities and observances, thereby truly showing our gratitude to God by expressing and reflecting His love.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, November 19, 1971

National Farm-City Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4094 - 85 Stat. 955

Proclamation 4094 of November 12, 1971

National Farm-City Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

More than at any time in our history, it is apparent that the quality of life in America tomorrow will greatly depend upon balanced growth in our Nation today.

The flourishing of agriculture upon our shores has been one of the greatest success stories in the history of man, and today Americans are the best fed people the world has ever known.

Yet average family income in non-metropolitan areas is 22 percent below that of metropolitan areas, and growing numbers of people have left rural America to seek fresh opportunity in the city. With this vast migration has come not just industrial progress, but also a host of new social and economic problems. Many of our cities are becoming less and less governable.

Only through balanced growth in both our rural and urban areas can we weather this gathering storm. It is time for all Americans to realize that we must have a strong rural economy in order to achieve orderly and beneficial urban growth.

In recognition of this need, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of November 19 through November 25, as National Farm-City Week and call upon all citizens wherever they live to participate in this observance.

I request that leaders of agricultural organizations, business groups, labor unions, youth and women's clubs, schools, and other interested groups, focus their attention upon the interrelationship of urban and rural community development.

I urge the Department of Agriculture, land-grant educational institutions, and all appropriate organizations and Government officials to mark the significance of National Farm-City Week with public meetings, exhibits, and presentations for the press, radio, and television.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 12th day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, November 8, 1971

Providing for the observance of "Youth Appreciation Week" during the seven-day period beginning the second Monday in November of 1971. - H.J. Res. 556 - Public Law 92-43 - 85 Stat. 100

Public Law 92-43
92nd Congress

Joint Resolution

Providing for the observance of "Youth Appreciation Week" during the seven-
day period beginning the second Monday in November of 1971.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the seven-day period beginning on the second Monday in November of 1971 is hereby designated as Youth Appreciation Week, and the President is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

Approved July 2, 1971.

Youth Appreciation Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4091 - 85 Stat. 950

Proclamation 4091 of November 5, 1971

Youth Appreciation Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. once said: "I think that, as life is action and passion, it is required of a man that he should share the passion and action of his time at peril of being judged not to have lived."

We can be proud of the extent to which our young men and women today are playing an active role in the continuing growth of our Nation. In organizations as diverse as student governments, vocational education, civic, social, business, religious and social action groups, these young citizens are learning the ideals of America by putting them into practice.

Hard work, cooperation, patriotism, and individual excellence—all of these come to be cherished by those who participate constructively in this building of America. And often this learning has expanded the ideals and conscience of America, refreshing our spirit.

As we move into the third century of our republic, the mantle of responsibility and leadership will be passed to this generation of Americans. I am convinced that the youth of today will wear that mantle proudly, carry out the responsibilities of adulthood and leadership with conviction and concern for their fellow man, and reflect great credit on their country.

In recognition of the national resource America's youth represents, and to promote greater understanding between our generations, the Congress by a joint resolution approved July 2, 1971 (Public Law 92-43), designated the seven-day period beginning November 8, 1971, as Youth Appreciation Week, and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week of November 8 through November 14, 1971, as Youth Appreciation Week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

I ask the education and social service professions, the communications media, and all other interested persons and groups to unite during the appointed week in public recognition of the youth of this Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 5th day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, October 25, 1971

Veterans Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4083 - 85 Stat. 942

Proclamation 4083 of September 23, 1971

Veterans Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

There are no persons more deeply devoted to peace than those who have directly experienced the horrors of war. And there is no group of Americans who have done more to prepare the way for lasting peace than those who have actively resisted the forces of aggression and tyranny as members of our Armed Forces.

Veterans Day, 1971, affords us a special opportunity to pay tribute to our Nation's veterans, and to express our gratitude and acknowledge our debt for all they have given to their country. But our observance of Veterans Day must not stop there. For we honor their devotion best when we renew our own devotion to their ideals: to courage and selflessness and loyalty and honor—and, above all, to lasting peace.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all Americans to join in commemorating Monday, October 25, 1971, as Veterans Day. I ask that all Americans join with me in paying tribute on that day to all those who have served this country as members of its Armed Forces in the past and to all those who are performing such service at home and abroad at this hour.

As a mark of our respect for these men and women, I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day and I request all Government officials to cooperate with civic and patriotic organizations in conducting appropriate public ceremonies throughout the land.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 24, 1971

American Education Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4090 - 85 Stat. 948

Proclamation 4090 of October 15, 1971

American Education Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Historian Henry Steele Commager has written that "No other people ever demanded so much of education as have the Americans. None other was ever served so well by its schools and educators."

What has been a characteristic of our history is even more dominant in our lives today. A system of education that has conferred inestimable benefits upon generation after generation of American citizens—that has contributed in large measure to the spirit and character of the American nation itself—continues to bring reality to the ideals of freedom, serving our people with the same dedication that it has always displayed and with an ever greater measure of effectiveness.

Yet it must be acknowledged that the challenge to our educational system is not diminishing, but mounting. For we recognize that our success in meeting unprecedented social, scientific, and physical change, and in directing its forces to positive ends, will be determined essentially by the quality of our schools, colleges, and universities, by the wisdom with which we develop and employ new educational techniques and technologies, and above all, by the compassion and understanding with which we reach out to all people—especially the young—and impart to each the intellectual and occupational enrichment which every American deserves.

After a period of uncertainty in educational matters, we are surer now of how that challenge shall be met. Our country is moving purposefully and effectively to strengthen and develop the great partnership of interests—Federal, State, local and private—through which we can accomplish our educational aims. Our educational leaders are not acting independently but with a new sense of cooperative unity, determined to use all resources, explore all initiatives, and recast the laws, if necessary, in order to serve our national needs. This is not an easy task, and if we are to succeed, we must call upon the assistance and support of all the American people.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the period of October 24 through October 30, 1971 as American Education Week.

I urge all my fellow Americans to make known during this week their appreciation for the truly heroic efforts of our teachers and all our education professionals upon whose humane skills so much of our greatness as a people depends. I ask moreover that we focus upon education as the central task of a democracy and the indispensable ally of liberty. Let the clarity of our vision and the boldness of our actions match the magnitude of our cause.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of October in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

United Nations Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4066 - 85 Stat. 917

Proclamation 4066 of July 9, 1971

United Nations Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year on October 24, the people of America and the world join in the formal observance of a truly global occasion, one that transcends political, cultural, religious, and calendar differences in its promise for all mankind: the anniversary of the United Nations Charter. This fall, as the United Nations completes its twenty-sixth year of service to the world, United Nations Day is an occasion to look back with gratitude and a measure of pride, and to look ahead with determination and hope.

Reviewing the work of the United Nations since 1945, we can see a substantial record of accomplishment in the world body's major areas of endeavor—"to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war . . . and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom," as the Charter states them. The United States will continue in the future, as it has in the past, to support the efforts of the UN in these great tasks.

At the same time, this country and its fellow member countries of the UN must act together to meet the new problems this new decade thrusts upon us. Through the UN, we all share stewardship over the planet Earth: together we face the challenges of coordinating measures to heal and protect the world's fragile ecosystems; of ensuring that the resources of the sea are developed for the benefit of all mankind; of promoting international cooperation in the use of outer space. Through the UN, we all share responsibility for making the human community more humane: together we face the challenges of curbing such vicious international crimes as narcotics trafficking, air piracy, and terrorism against diplomats; of moderating explosive population growth; of protecting the human rights of prisoners of war and refugees.

The roots of American commitment to the United Nations go far deeper than the words of a charter signed at San Francisco or the glass and steel of a headquarters in New York—they spring from the hearts of the American people. With the world in urgent need of a dynamic, effective international organization, it is appropriate for us as a people and as individuals to renew our sense of tough-minded dedication to making the UN work. The President's Commission for the Observance of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the United Nations, under the chairmanship of Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, recently submitted to me its recommendations for measures to increase the effectiveness of the United Nations and of American participation therein. I am giving this useful report close study, and I commend it to the attention of every concerned citizen. Only "we the peoples of the United Nations," who ordained the UN Charter and charged it with man's highest hopes, have the power to make it succeed.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, October 24, 1971, as United Nations Day. I urge the citizens of this Nation to observe that day with community programs which will express realistic understanding and support for the United Nations and its associated organizations.

I also call upon the appropriate officials to encourage citizens' groups and agencies of communication—press, radio, television, and motion pictures—to engage in appropriate observance of United Nations Day this year in cooperation with the United Nations Association of the United States of America and other interested organizations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Wednesday, October 20, 1971

National Day of Prayer - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4087 - 85 Stat. 946

Proclamation 4087 of October 12, 1971

National Day of Prayer, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The great need of our time is that of reconcihation. Nations should be reconciled to nations, races to races, families to families, individuals to individuals. Reconciliation is needed among communities, among ethnic groups, among religious denominations, among social and economic classes, among family members.

The work of reconciliation is too great to be left to man alone. In this work, man needs God, the Supreme Reconciler. The Bible tells us God is the source of reconciliation, in Whom all things are one. Under the fatherhood of God, there flourishes the brotherhood of man.

The world yearns for reconciliation, and for the renewal and the solidarity and the healing that reconciliation brings. This hunger can only be met in its fullness through prayer.

In 1952 the Congress directed the President to set aside a suitable day other than a Sunday each year as a National Day of Prayer. On this day we give special recognition to the Nation's deep religious heritage, and we ask God's help and His blessing.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 20, as National Day of Prayer, 1971. On this day I urge that Americans pray for the fullness of reconciliation among all peoples, and for progress toward ending divisiveness in our own land and in the international community. Let us especially pray for reconciliation in Southeast Asia, and for a speedy return to their loved ones of our long-suffering prisoners of war.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 17, 1971

National Forest Products Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4088 - 85 Stat. 947

Proclamation 4088 of October 13, 1971

National Forest Products Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Today, we are acutely aware of the scarcity of our Nation's vital resources. Some have been lost irretrievably, but others, including products from forests, lend themselves to long-term management.

As our country has grown, it has become increasingly dependent on our forest resources for shelter, furnishings, paper and many other products essential to our way of life. But only now are we beginning to truly appreciate the importance of forests for maintaining a balanced ecology. We must make effective use and management of our forests with due regard for the environment so that we will strengthen our rural economy as well as provide aesthetic and recreational benefits for our people.

The Congress, in order to emphasize the importance of forest resources and forest products to the Nation, has by a joint resolution of September 13, 1960 (74 Stat. 898) designated the seven-day period beginning 36 use 163, on the third Sunday of October in each year as National Forest Products Week, and has requested the President to issue an annual proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week beginning October 17, 1971, as National Forest Products Week, with activities and ceremonies designed to focus our attention on the forest resources with which we have been so abundantly blessed and the ways which these resources can contribute to our material, emotional, and spiritual advantage.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, October 16, 1971

National Newspaperboy Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4085 - 85 Stat. 944

Proclamation 4085 of September 30, 1971

National Newspaperboy Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

This day affords an opportunity to pay tribute to the one million American newspaperboys—who every day travel more than a million miles and distribute more than 62 million newspapers, by their diligence earning some $600 million each year for themselves and, in many cases, as a help to their families.

Besides developing sound work habits, these young businessmen— chiefly between the ages of 12 and 15—learn early how to be contributing members of society, acquiring habits of independence and punctuality and a sense of responsibility. Newspaperboys are seldom delinquents. They are busy, and busy boys have neither the time nor the inclination to get into trouble. They are good citizens.

The roster of former newspaperboys reads like a Who's Who of successful businessmen, statesmen, government officials, performing artists, clergymen, doctors and lawyers. A partial listing includes Ralph Bunche, Tom C. Clark, Bing Crosby, Bob Considine, Richard Cardinal Cushing, Jack Dempsey, Jimmy Durante, Dwight Eisenhower, Ernie Ford, John Glenn, Herbert Hoover, J. Edgar Hoover, Bob Hope, John W. McCormack, Charles Percy, David Sarnoff, Alan Shepard, Red Skelton, Ed Sullivan and John Wayne.

Without newspaperboys, freedom of the press would be more an ideal than a reality. Since the newspaperboy is the actual link between publisher and reader, he gives practical expression to this basic American right.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Saturday, October 16, 1971, as National Newspaperboy Day. I urge the citizens of this Nation to honor American newspaperboys for their significant contribution to the civic, social and economic good of the United States.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-six.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, October 15, 1971

White Cane Safety Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4062 - 85 Stat. 913

Proclamation 4062 of July 1, 1971

White Cane Safety Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In our highly mobile society where city streets are jammed with motor vehicles, a number of safeguards such as traffic lights, "Walk" signs, and hatched crosswalks have been introduced to promote pedestrian safety. In the world of the blind and visually handicapped this same purpose is served by a single small device, often weighing less than half a pound. It is the white cane.

For its owner the white cane is at once a sensor and a guide, and even as it denotes his physical limitation it speaks eloquently for his capability. Training programs instituted throughout the Nation in recent years have developed travel techniques for white cane users that instill self-confidence and a sense of independence. As a result, the white cane has become a symbol of achievement—the achievement of its owner in learning to cope with his environment and to move readily on his way.

But this new mobility cannot be fully realized without the cooperation of fellow pedestrians and the willingness of motorists to give way. An understanding of the potential dangers which city streets hold for blind citizens is commendable, but adequate protection for them can be provided only by strict observance of safety measures.

Our recognition of the white cane and its significance must be immediate; and our reaction equally as rapid. It takes only a second for a motorist to accept second place, but that instant's inhibition may save a life. There is no better time to be our brother's keeper.

To make our people more fully aware of the significance of the white cane, and of the need for motorists to exercise caution and courtesy when approaching persons carrying a white cane, the Congress, by joint resolution, approved October 6, 1964 (78 Stat. 1003), has authorized the President to proclaim October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1971 as White Cane Safety Day.

I call upon all our citizens to join individually in this observance, that blind persons in our society may continue to enjoy the greatest possible measure of personal independence.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of July in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, October 11, 1971

Columbus Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4078 - 85 Stat. 936

Proclamation 4078 of August 31, 1971

Columbus Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Columbus Day, 1971, we honor once more the memory of the great captain whose historic voyages led to the migration of peoples to the New World and brought fresh promises of liberty and freedom to the Old.

In this present age of epic journeys in space, we can appreciate more than ever the great achievements of Christopher Columbus. An intrepid explorer, a supreme navigator, but above all a man of unshakeable faith and courage, this son of Italy sailed in the service of the Spanish crown on a mission that forever broadened man's hopes and horizons.

We take pride in commemorating the vision and determination of Christopher Columbus, and carry forward his spirit of exploration as part of our national heritage.

In tribute to the achievements of Columbus, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 657), as modified by the Act of June 28, 1968 (82 Stat. 250), requested the President to proclaim the second Monday in October of each year as Columbus Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 11, 1971, as Columbus Day; and I invite the people of this Nation to observe that day in schools, churches, and other suitable places with appropriate ceremonies in honor of the great explorer.

I also direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on the appointed day in memory of Christopher Columbus.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand, this 31st day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

General Pulaski's Memorial Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4069 - 85 Stat. 921

Proclamation 4069 of July 26, 1971

General Pulaski's Memorial Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The one hundred and ninety-second anniversary of the death of General Casimir Pulaski on October 11, 1779, in the battle of Savannah, reminds us of the great sacrifice he made for our national independence.

General Pulaski believed that the cause of human freedom was indivisible. He fought against foreign suppression in his native Poland and he joined the struggle for American independence by volunteering in the Continental Army.

On this anniversary of General Pulaski's death, it is appropriate that we note with gratitude his historic contribution—and that of succeeding generations of Americans of Polish origin—to the freedom and progress of this Nation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 11, 1971, as General Pulaski's Memorial Day. I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I also invite the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies honoring the memory of General Pulaski and the contributions which he and others from his homeland have made to our national life.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 26th day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 10, 1971

National School Lunch Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4086 - 85 Stat. 945

Proclamation 4086 of October 9, 1971

National School Lunch Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The National School Lunch Program celebrates its Silver Anniversary this year. For the past quarter century, this important program has made a magnificent contribution to both the education and health of our Nation.

The National School Lunch Program is a product of cooperation among parents, civic groups, and all levels of government. It encourages better nutrition for the schoolchildren of America. In all the participating schools, this program provides free or reduced-price lunches to needy pupils.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of October 9, 1962, designated the week beginning on the second Sunday of October in each year as National School Lunch Week, and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby urge the people of the United States to observe the week of October 10, 1971, as National School Lunch Week with appropriate ceremonies and activities designed to promote good nutrition in our schools.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 9th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, October 9, 1971

Leif Erikson Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4081 - 85 Stat. 940

Proclamation 4081 of September 21, 1971

Leif Erikson Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Nearly a thousand years ago Leif Erikson, a bold and intrepid Norseman, left familiar waters with a small band of men to face the dangers of the North Atlantic and sail to the shores of this continent. The exploits of Leif Erikson are still in large part shrouded in the mists of history, and only now are we beginning to appreciate fully the magnitude of those explorations.

If the details of Leif Erikson's adventures are still hidden from our view, his courage is not. He and his shipmates are worthy guides to us today, and our journey into the unknown still draws inspiration from them. It is therefore most appropriate that we give national recognition to Leif Erikson, and I am most happy to meet the request of the Congress of the United States, in a joint resolution approved September 2, 1964 (78 Stat. 849), that the President proclaim October 9 in each year as Leif Erikson Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Saturday, October 9, 1971, as Leif Erikson Day; and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings that day.

I also invite the people of the United States to honor the memory of Leif Erikson on that day by holding appropriate exercises and ceremonies.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, October 4, 1971

Child Health Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4082 - 85 Stat. 941

Proclamation 4082 of September 23, 1971

Child Health Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The strength and energy of a society may be measured today and predicted for tomorrow by the health of its children. Robust bodies, bright eyes, sharp minds: all of these define the quality of life in this country now and for the future.

Caring for the health of our 70 million citizens under eighteen and the nearly four million babies born each year is not merely a choice for today, but also a duty to tomorrow.

All our children deserve to be free from preventable sickness and handicaps. If they suffer illness or handicap, they should have the best care possible.

We need to insure that parents are helped to bear healthy babies; that infants receive optimal care; that the health of the children is protected and enhanced during the growing years; that abnormalities of development are prevented or ameliorated.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, pursuant to a joint resolution of May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 143), do hereby designate Monday, October 4, 1971, as Child Health Day.

I invite all agencies and organizations interested in child welfare to unite upon that day in such activities as will awaken the people of the Nation to the fundamental necessity of a year-round program for the protection and development of the health of the Nation's children.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 3, 1971

Drug Abuse Prevention Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4080 - 85 Stat. 938

Proclamation 4080 of September 17, 1971

Drug Abuse Prevention Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

"What shall it profit a man," the Bible asks, "if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" It is a question which the menace of drug abuse poses anew to all of us.

What can a nation profit from its abundant good life, if the same technology and material wealth which have yielded that abundance permits millions of its people, particularly its youth, to drift into the chemical modification of mind and mood at grave risk to their health—to their very lives? What can a nation profit from its unparalleled individual freedom, if that liberty becomes license and that license leads to drug dependence which controls the bodies and warps the minds of men, women, children, and even the unborn?

Not so long ago it was easy enough to regard the tragedy of drug abuse as "someone else's problem." But recent years have brought that tragedy home—often very literally—to all Americans. We have learned that "drug abuse" refers not only to the crime-prone heroin addict— though that is the disease at its deadliest, with over 1,000 heroin fatalities annually in New York City. The term also refers to the suburban housewife dependent on tranquilizers or diet pills; to the truck driver over-reliant on pep pills; to the student leaning on amphetamines to help him cram for exams; even to pre-teens sniffing glue.

It has become a problem that touches each of us. Its manifestations are many and varied, but all grow from a common root—psychological and physical needs unmet through legitimate social channels—and all feed on a common ignorance—ignorance of the profound harm the abuser does to himself and society. Drug abuse is nothing less than a life and death matter for countless Americans, and for the moral fiber of this Nation. The drive to meet this threat must command from us our very best—our attention, our energies, our resources and our prayers.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning October 3, 1971, as the second annual Drug Abuse Prevention Week.

I call upon officials of the Federal Government under the leadership of the new Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention, particularly those officials in the Departments of Health, Education and Welfare, Justice, and Defense, to join with educators and the medical profession in intensifying programs to prevent and reduce drug abuse among the young and among all Americans. I urge State and local governments, as well as business and civic groups, to cooperate in such programs and to seek out new methods by which the risks and dangers of drug experimentation can be communicated to the entire Nation. The communications media can render invaluable assistance in this endeavor, and I urge them to do so.

I also encourage the clergy, and all of our moral and spiritual leaders, to make a special effort during this week to take up the problem of drug abuse and to offer those answers of the spirit which alone can fill the void where drug abuse begins.

And I appeal, above all, to those who bear the special trusts of parenthood—that all of us may rededicate ourselves to the well-being of America's youth; and that we may so teach them, so guide them, so reach out to them in understanding and compassion, as to help them avoid the problems that arise from abuse of drugs and to attain the full promise of their maturity.

IN WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Employ the Handicapped Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4073 - 85 Stat. 925

Proclamation 4073 of August 13, 1971

National Employ The Handicapped Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From Beethoven, who could not hear but gave the world magnificent symphonies, to Franklin Roosevelt, who could not walk but led America through giant strides in peace and war, history is full of proof that the whole of human potential is far greater than the sum of its physical parts—limbs or organs, or faculties.

It was in recognition of this truth, and of the Hebrew wisdom that "the best alms are . . . to enable a man to dispense with alms," that the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped was established 24 years ago. For nearly a quarter century now, business, government, and the public have worked together as partners in this Committee—to open a newly self-reliant and fulfilling way of life for many thousands of handicapped men and women, and to unlock for the rest of us the benefits of the unique contribution each handicapped person has to make. Through such efforts, American society is learning that no handicap is insurmountable when a man has an unlimited view of himself and an ounce of help from his fellows.

This is a record to be proud of—and to build on still more energetically. Our responsibility to help provide training, jobs, and real opportunity for those who are handicapped as a result of accidents, birth defects, or disease, is a continuing challenge. In addition, we bear today the special trust of redeeming the sacrifices of our disabled veterans of the Vietnam era by giving them the very best in rehabilitation and employment assistance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, in accordance with the joint resolution of Congress approved August 11, 1945, as amended (36 U.S.C. 155), designating the first full week of October of each year as National Employ the Handicapped Week, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week beginning October 3, 1971, for such purpose.

I urge the Nation's Governors, mayors, and all other public officials, as well as leaders in every area of American life, to join with the handicapped themselves in active participation in this observance.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Fire Prevention Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4059 - 85 Stat. 910

Proclamation 4059 of June 7, 1971

Fire Prevention Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Despite unparalleled technological advances in many areas of our society, uncontrolled fires continue to bring a great deal of tragedy and widespread loss to our Nation. Fires now kill more than 12,000 persons each year and cause annual property losses exceeding $2 billion.

The most shameful aspect of this terrible waste is that it is so unnecessary. Most fires are caused by carelessness, by lack of knowledge, or by hazardous conditions—all of which can be eliminated. But while we all give occasional lip-service to the importance of fire prevention, our deeds too often fail to match our words—and so the loss continues.

But this pattern need not continue. If each of us will only focus his attention on the practical implications of fire prevention in his daily life, a great deal can be done to reduce the destruction caused by fires.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning October 3, 1971, as Fire Prevention Week.

I call upon all citizens to participate in the fire prevention activities of their various governments, of community fire departments, and of the National Fire Protection Association. Every person should be alert to the ways in which he can eliminate fire hazards. Every citizen should learn how to report fires, how to use basic extinguishing agents and firefighting techniques, and how to react when major fires strike his place of work or his residence. The need to rethink all of these matters is especially important as new technologies change our living environments and the nature of the fire risks we encounter.

I also encourage all Federal agencies, in cooperation with the Federal Fire Council, to conduct effective fire prevention programs, including fire exit drills and other means of training employees, in order to help reduce this waste of life and resources which now plagues our Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of June in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, October 1, 1971

Country Music Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4089 - 85 Stat. 948

Proclamation 4089 of October 14, 1971

Country Music Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From 1923, when Fiddlin' John Carson made the first tremendously successful country recording until today when country sounds can be heard on over 700 radio stations, the popularity of country music has been a notable part of our American culture.

Why is country music so popular? Why is the Grand Ole Opry's audience made up of people who have traveled an estimated average of 450 miles one way to be there?

The answer is simple. Country music speaks to what is tried and true for many Americans. It speaks of the common things shared by all: the happiness of a family, the pains of a broken heart, the mercy of God, and the goodness of man.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, ask the people of this Nation to mark the month of October, 1971, with suitable observances as Country Music Month.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, September 19, 1971

National Highway Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4072 - 85 Stat. 924

Proclamation 4072 of August 12, 1971

National Highway Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

When the Erie Canal opened in 1825 it quickly acquired the slogan "A Cent and a Half a Mile, a Mile and a Half an Hour." Our toll roads now cost the traveller nearly the same amount, but the trip from New York to Buffalo that once took five days by barge at a mile and a half per hour now takes less than ten hours by automobile and can be travelled at 65 miles per hour.

The highways built since the Erie Canal have become the dominant element in our national transportation system and a key force in virtually every phase of modern American life. These roads not only provide avenues of commerce for our nation's economy, but also help to make available the services and pleasures of our daily existence. Our rapidly developing 42,500 mile System of Interstate and Defense Highway is especially helpful for the traveller who wishes to visit recreational areas and historic sites that previously were known only through photographs.

In our present day, by serving as the conduit for a large proportion of mass transit in urban areas, highways go far toward meeting our needs for the best possible transportation. In the future, as a part of a balanced system of growth, they should be a key part of an integrated and comprehensive transportation plan for these urban areas, linking other vital means of transportation by air, rail and water. In this proliferation of American highways we find a clear reflection of the good which men can do by planning and working together in common needs.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 19, 1971, as National Highway Week. I urge Federal, State, and local government officials, as well as highway industry and other organizations, to hold appropriate ceremonies during that week in recognition of what highway transportation means to our country.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, September 17, 1971

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4077 - 85 Stat. 935

Proclamation 4077 of August 30, 1971

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The Constitution of the United States, as Woodrow Wilson observed early in this century, "is not a mere lawyers' document: it is a vehicle of life, and its spirit is always the spirit of the age."

To each new generation of American citizens, this lesson comes afresh. To the young of today, it has come dramatically this year with the passage of the Twenty-Sixth Amendment, granting full voting rights to those between 18 and 21 years of age.

As citizens of all ages join in welcoming these young people into the electorate, we can also unite with them in recognizing that our Constitution does have a special relevance for every age. Enduring and timeless, yet it is vital and life-giving, affirming as no other written document can that the ideals upon which men acted in the early days of our Republic are as essential now as they were then.

In commemoration of the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, and in recognition of all who had attained citizenship during the year, the Congress on February 29, 1952, approved a joint resolution (66 Stat. 9) setting aside the seventeenth day of September of each year as Citizenship Day. On August 2, 1956, the Congress approved a second joint resolution (70 Stat. 932), requesting the President to designate the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as Constitution Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on Citizenship Day, September 17, 1971. I also counsel and urge Federal, State, and local officials, as well as religious, civic, educational, and other interested organizations to make arrangements for the observance of that day with appropriate ceremonies.

I also designate the period beginning September 17 and ending September 23, 1971, as Constitution Week; and I urge the people of the United States to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities in their schools and churches, and in other suitable places, to the end that our citizens, whether they be naturalized or natural born, may have a better understanding of the Constitution and of the rights and responsibilities of United States citizenship.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, September 12, 1971

National Hispanic Heritage Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4079 - 85 Stat. 937

Proclamation 4079 of September 13, 1971

National Hispanic Heritage Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From the earliest explorations of the New World, men and women of Hispanic origin and descent have contributed significantly to the development of our American nationality. The geographic .names of our country fully attest to that contribution. In fact, the oldest city in the United States, St. Augustine, Florida, was founded by Spanish explorers in 1565—406 years ago. Amerigo Vespucci, the man whose name graces our land, came to this hemisphere on a Spanish ship.

Our Hispanic heritage touches our everyday lives as well—our music, our architecture, our currency, and our cuisine. The voyages of Spanish explorers to the New World are a common starting point for the study of American history in our schools. Americans of Hispanic origin and descent have served our country with distinction throughout our State, local, and national governments—and continue to do so today.

In the past, men and women of Hispanic origin and descent helped to discover, develop, and people this land. We are fortunate that today they are our own people.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of Congress approved September 17, 1968, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 12, 1971, and ending September 18, 1971, as National Hispanic Heritage Week. I call upon the people of the United States, especially the educational community, to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities which call attention to the richness of our Hispanic heritage and the contributions to our diverse society by our citizens of Hispanic origin.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, August 2, 1971

American Trial Lawyers Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4070 - 85 Stat. 922

Proclamation 4070 of July 30, 1971

American Trial Lawyers Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The idea of a fair trial, a legal scholar has observed, "has been the greatest contribution made to civilization by our Anglo-American polity." For twenty-five years, the members of the American Trial Lawyers Association have sought to translate this noble inspiration into an everyday reality for those whose disputes and grievances must be settled in a court of law.

Through the adversary process, these lawyers have now established a long and proud tradition and have shown that the methods and values of the trial advocate may serve as a model for the just resolution of disputes among men. Their continuing commitment to fair and orderly trials has become an essential part of the administration of justice in America.

In honor of the American Trial Lawyers Association on the occasion of its twenty-fifth anniversary, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 714, has designated the week beginning August 1, 1971, as American Trial Lawyers Week and has requested the President to encourage appropriate observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon each American, during American Trial Lawyers Week, to renew his commitment to enhance the administration of justice for the public good; and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Monday, August 2, 1971.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, August 1, 1971

National Clown Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4071 - 85 Stat. 923

Proclamation 4071 of August 2, 1971

National Clown Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whoever has heard the laughter of a child or seen sudden delight on the face of a lonely old man has understood in those brief moments mysteries deeper than love.

All men are indebted to those who bring such moments of quiet splendor—who redeem sickness and pain with joy. All across America, good men in putty noses and baggy trousers, following a tradition as old as man's need to touch gently the lives of his fellowman, go into orphanages and children's hospitals, homes for the elderly and for the retarded, and give a part of themselves. Today, as always, clowns and the spirit they represent are as vital to the maintenance of our humanity as the builders and the growers and the governors.

In the folklore of the world is the persistent claim that the heart of a clown is sad, and that all the gladness he provokes is simply a facade for the pain he cannot reveal to the world. In the myth is the kernel of reason: the clown leaves happiness where he goes, and takes misery away with him.

Yet, we cannot suppose there is real truth in the myth. For surely the laugh-makers are blessed: they heal the heart of the world.

To call public attention to the charitable activities of clowns and the wholesome entertainment they provide for all our citizens, the Congress by a joint resolution approved October 8, 1970 (Public Law 91-433), has requested the President to designate the week of August 1 through August 7, 1971, as National Clown Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of August 1 through August 7, 1971, as National Clown Week. I invite the Governors of the States and the appropriate officials of other areas under the United States flag to issue similar proclamations.

I urge the people of the United States to recognize the contributions made by clowns in their entertainment at children's hospitals, charitable institutions, institutions for the mentally retarded, and generally helping to lift the spirits and boost the morale of our people.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, July 25, 1971

National Star Route Mail Carriers Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4063 - 85 Stat. 914

Proclamation 4063 of July 1, 1971

National Star Route Mail Carriers Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In 1845 Congress provided that future mail transportation contracts were to be awarded by the Postmaster General "to the lowest bidder, tendering sufficient guarantees for faithful performance, without other reference to the mode of such transportation than may be necessary to provide for the due celerity, certainty, and security of such transportation."

That statute not only opened a colorful chapter in American postal service, but also set forth a bold new standard for transportation of the mails: "Celerity, Certainty, and Security," Bids from private contractors under the 1845 law were soon marked on the books of the Post Office Department with three stars, signifying the three points of that motto. Over time, the bids themselves became known as "star bids," and eventually the contract service for transporting the mail by all modes, except boats and railways, came to be known as "star route mail service."

Since the inception of this service 126 years ago, star route carriers have performed an important task for the American people, transporting the mail over thousands of miles of roads where regular postal service was unavailable. In recent years, the star route carriers have also made an important contribution to rural America, often supplementing the efforts of the regular carriers.

In recognition of the dedicated public service of our star route carriers, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 583, has requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the last full week in July of 1971 as National Star Route Mail Carriers Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning July 25, 1971, as National Star Route Mail Carriers Week.

I urge the Postal Service, and all interested groups and organizations, to observe that week with appropriate recognition to the Nation's star route mail carriers.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Farm Safety Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4044 - 85 Stat. 894

Proclamation 4044 of April 7, 1971

National Farm Safety Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Primitive man's first discoveries about cultivating the land came by chance, and for thousands of years thereafter agriculture progressed only slowly out of the realm of guesswork. Even in the early days of this Nation, when we were a people of farmers and planters, the process of coaxing life out of the earth remained far more an art than a science. But today American agriculture has become a fully realized technology largely subject to human planning and control—a bountiful producer of food, clothing, and the makings of the good life for America and the world.

Thus there is sharp irony in the fact that this great industry, so accomplished in the scientific nurture of plant and animal life, remains among the industries in which human life is most precarious and accident rates are highest. The farm and ranch environment abounds in potential hazards—powerful machinery, exposed working conditions, physically demanding jobs—but experience has shown that caution, common sense, and protective equipment can do much to counter them and keep accidents and injuries to a minimum. All who live and work on America's farms and ranches owe it to themselves, their families, and the nation that depends on them, to put safety first. Let us set the goal of eliminating chance from rural life just as we have learned to exclude it from agricultural production.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of July 25, 1971, as National Farm Safety Week. I urge farm families and all in the rural community to make every effort to reduce accidents occurring at work, home, in recreation and on the highway.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Wednesday, July 21, 1971

World Law Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4060 - 85 Stat. 911

Proclamation 4060 of June 17, 1971

World Law Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From the time more than 25 centuries ago when a Hebrew prophet wrote, "The Lord is our judge . . . our lawgiver . . . our king; he will save us," Western civilization's sense of salvation has been intimately related to its vision of the universal rule of law in the affairs of men. We in the United States have special reason to cherish this vision, for the freedom, the order, and the abundance which we enjoy are fruits of its application. The great principle that the people are sovereign, and that the law they make is supreme, has operated with such signal success in our country's history that Americans are turning increasingly to the compelling logic of putting it to work in the world community as well. People of many other nations and cultures are doing likewise.

At the same time technology is shrinking the globe so that the sense of common destiny and common danger, the sense that "my country is the world; and my countrymen are mankind," is no longer fancy but compelling fact for the whole human race. More and more, it becomes a matter of prime importance that principle and not mere power should govern in this country called Earth.

We can see many heartening evidences that law is becoming stronger and more just around the world under the pressures which reason and necessity exert. Within the nations, human rights and ecological wisdom continue to gain stature in the law. Among the nations, security and cooperation—on every front from space to the seabeds—are being enhanced through negotiations, treaties, and conventions. The United Nations is entering its second quarter of a century, and many other international organizations are working effectively through and for world law.

Also playing a constructive role are those organizations which are made up not of countries but of individual men and women, joined together in the interest of the law as citizens of their countries and of the world. One of the most important of these is the World Peace Through Law Center, founded in 1963, which this summer will hold its Fifth World Conference on World Peace Through Law at Belgrade, Yugoslavia. July 21, the date when thousands of lawyers and jurists from around the world will convene for this conference, will be observed in many nations as World Law Day—an observance in which I know the American people, a people who love the law, will want to join.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim July 21, 1971, as World Law Day. I call on every American to reflect that day on the sacredness of the law in American tradition. And I urge each American to join with millions of his fellow men around the world in heightened recognition of the importance of the rule of law in international affairs to our goal of a stable peace.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 17th day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Tuesday, July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4067 - 85 Stat. 919

Proclamation 4067 of July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The United States has special reason to remember July 20, 1969, with pride, for it was on this date that two of our Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., landed on the moon. Armstrong's message, "The Eagle has landed," marked the achievement of what men had dreamed of over the centuries: to navigate through space and land on another celestial body. Soon after their landing at the Sea of Tranquility, both astronauts walked on the surface of the moon, placed an American flag on its soil, gathered samples of soil and rocks, and emplaced scientific recording equipment. Man's exploration of the moon had begun.

Since the historic flight of Apollo 11, American astronauts have extended man's exploration of the moon to the Ocean of Storms with Apollo 12 and the hills of Frau Mauro with Apollo 14, with rich scientific return. Next week, Apollo 15 is scheduled to head for another different region of the moon to explore the base of the 12,000-foot Apennine Mountains and the rim of the 1,300 foot canyon-like Hadley Rille. Thus, two years after the first landing on the moon, other brave men are following in the footsteps of Armstrong and Aldrin to explore the unknown and advance scientific knowledge for the benefit of all mankind.

To commemorate the anniversary of the first moon walk on July 20, 1969, and to accord recognition to the many achievements of the national space program, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 101, has requested that the President issue a proclamation designating July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day, I urge all Americans, and interested groups and organizations, to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs designed to show their pride in this great national achievement.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Moon Walk Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4067 - 85 Stat. 919

Proclamation 4067 of July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The United States has special reason to remember July 20, 1969, with pride, for it was on this date that two of our Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., landed on the moon. Armstrong's message, "The Eagle has landed," marked the achievement of what men had dreamed of over the centuries: to navigate through space and land on another celestial body. Soon after their landing at the Sea of Tranquility, both astronauts walked on the surface of the moon, placed an American flag on its soil, gathered samples of soil and rocks, and emplaced scientific recording equipment. Man's exploration of the moon had begun.

Since the historic flight of Apollo 11, American astronauts have extended man's exploration of the moon to the Ocean of Storms with Apollo 12 and the hills of Frau Mauro with Apollo 14, with rich scientific return. Next week, Apollo 15 is scheduled to head for another different region of the moon to explore the base of the 12,000-foot Apennine Mountains and the rim of the 1,300 foot canyon-like Hadley Rille. Thus, two years after the first landing on the moon, other brave men are following in the footsteps of Armstrong and Aldrin to explore the unknown and advance scientific knowledge for the benefit of all mankind.

To commemorate the anniversary of the first moon walk on July 20, 1969, and to accord recognition to the many achievements of the national space program, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 101, has requested that the President issue a proclamation designating July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day, I urge all Americans, and interested groups and organizations, to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs designed to show their pride in this great national achievement.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON