Thursday, February 4, 1971

USO Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4029 - 85 Stat. 877

Proclamation 4029 of February 2, 1971

USO Day

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On February 4, 1971, the United Service Organizations, affectionately known as the USO, will celebrate its thirtieth anniversary.

Its exclusive mission, since its beginning prior to World War II, has been to serve the morale, spiritual, recreational, and entertainment needs of the Armed Forces.

In war and peace the USO, with its thousands of patriotic volunteers, has kept the faith with millions of Americans as they have been called into the service of their nation.

Neither asking for nor receiving any financial support from the Government, the USO has been described as an expression of the continuing concern of Main Street America for its sons and daughters in uniform, wherever they serve.

For the past three decades, the American people have voluntarily given their support, both financial and personal, to bolster the morale of our servicemen and women through the operation of the USO. It continues to give an answer to the two questions always on the minds of the young men and women in uniform, "Does anyone know I'm here?" and "Does anyone care?".

Over the years, the USO has continued to give a resounding "Yes" on behalf of all thoughtful Americans.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim February 4, 1971, as USO Day, and urge the people of the United States to give their enthusiastic support to the United Service Organizations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 2nd day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, February 1, 1971

American Heart Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4027 - 85 Stat. 875

Proclamation 4027 of January 22, 1971

American Heart Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The special effort to combat diseases of the heart and circulation initiated in the United States more than twenty years ago has been tremendously successful. Advances have been made in every aspect of cardiovascular medicine—in basic understanding, in preventive measures, in methods of diagnosis, in instrumentation, in surgical treatment, in drug therapy, in patient care, in rehabilitation. Heart victims everywhere have enormously benefited.

This progress is clearly reflected in our overall cardiovascular mortality rate, which has been reduced more than 14 percent. However, there is much to be done before this killer disease is conquered. Heart and blood vessel diseases still afflict more than 27 million persons in our country. They take over one million lives annually and they exact a tremendous toll in suffering, disability, and economic loss.

The progress we have witnessed these past years has been achieved primarily because of the programs supported by the Federal Government's National Heart and Lung Institute and the American Heart Association, a private voluntary agency. Allied with other public and private interests by common purpose, they constitute a continuing force for progress in reducing death and disability from cardiovascular causes. To sustain the forward march, however, the concern and support of all Americans is needed. With this support, the conquest of heart disease can be an attainable goal.

To help encourage this support, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 30, 1963 (77 Stat. 843), requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating February as American Heart Month.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of February 1971 as American Heart Month, and I invite the Governors of the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to issue similar proclamations.

I urge the people of the United States to give heed to the nationwide problem of heart disease and to support the programs essential to bring about its solution.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON