Sunday, March 21, 1971

National Week of Concern for Americans Who Are Prisoners of War or Missing in Action - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4038 - 85 Stat. 888

Proclamation 4038 of March 19, 1971

National Week of Concern for Americans Who Are Prisoners of War or Missing in Action

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The first American still being held by the enemy was captured in South Vietnam on March 26, 1964. Now, with the seventh anniversary of that event approaching, the number of Americans missing in action or known captured in the Vietnamese conflict has grown to about 1,600. Most of these men are officers and enlisted men of the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, and the Marine Corps; some are civilians. Even in captivity, they continue to serve our Nation in the highest sense of honor and duty to country. We owe them, in turn, no less than our strongest support and our firmest pledge that we will neither forget them nor abandon them.

This Government has made and will continue to make strenuous efforts in behalf of these Americans who are prisoners of war or missing in action. In the face of the enemy's callous indifference to the plight of these men and their families, we have sought to focus the attention of the world on the barbaric attitude of North Vietnam and its agents throughout Indochina. We have conducted vigorous diplomatic efforts to resolve the prisoner of war problem on a purely humane basis for the prisoners we hold as well as for our brave men held prisoner.

The Geneva Prisoner of War Convention of 1949 sets forth the minimum standards for humanitarian treatment applying to all prisoners of war. Some 125 nations including all of those involved on both sides in the Southeast Asia hostilities have acceded to the Geneva Convention and have pledged to observe its humane standards. And on a moral plane above and apart from these formal rules, all civilized peoples are subject to the basic humanitarian standards long established in international law and custom.

In view of the continuing disregard of this Convention and basic humane standards by North Vietnam and its agents—their refusal to identify all of the Americans being held, to permit impartial inspection of their camps, to release the seriously sick and wounded prisoners, to provide humane treatment, and to permit prisoners to correspond regularly with their families—and in view of their adamant refusal to consider negotiation regarding the release of prisoners, the Congress of the United States has, by House Joint Resolution 16, requested the President to designate the period beginning March 21, 1971, and ending March 27, 1971, as "National Week of Concern for Prisoners of War/Missing in Action."

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the period March 21, 1971, through March 27, 1971, as National Week of Concern for Americans Who Are Prisoners of War or Missing in Action. I call upon all the people of the United States to observe this week in heartfelt prayer, and in ceremonies and activities appropriate to voice deep concern for the prisoners and missing men, to inspire their loved ones with new courage and hope, and to hasten the day when their ordeal may end.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Poison Prevention Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4030 - 85 Stat. 878

Proclamation 4030 of February 8, 1971

National Poison Prevention Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Although the number of children who die from poisoning has been declining, approximately 75,000 accidental poisonings and some 300 deaths among children under the age of five are still reported every year. Young children cannot differentiate between things that are meant to be swallowed and those that are not meant to be swallowed. We adults must make this distinction, and we must be constantly on the alert to avoid a poisoning incident.

The Poison Prevention Packaging Act, which I recently signed into law, will provide for child-resistant containers for toxic or harmful household substances, and will help to end the tragedy of childhood poisonings.

To focus attention on the dangers of accidental poisoning, the Congress in a joint resolution of September 26, 1961 (75 Stat. 681), requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating the third week in March as National Poison Prevention Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning March 21, 1971, as National Poison Prevention Week.

I direct the appropriate agencies of the Federal Government, and I invite State and local governments and voluntary organizations to participate actively in programs designed to promote better protection against accidental poisonings, particularly as they relate to young children.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, March 7, 1971

Volunteers of America Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4035 - 85 Stat. 884

Proclamation 4035 of March 8, 1971

Volunteers of America Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From the beginning of our country, Americans have worked together voluntarily to help master common needs and problems. This year marks the seventy-fifth anniversary of one of the Nation's leading voluntary action organizations, the Volunteers of America, devoted to solving the spiritual and social problems of our needy.

In recognition of the work of this humanitarian organization, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 337, has requested the President to designate the second week of March 1971 as Volunteers of America Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of March 7, 1971, as Volunteers of America Week. I urge our people during that week to express their appreciation and gratitude for the untiring and selfless work of the Volunteers of America and to continue their support of its activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Save Your Vision Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4034 - 85 Stat. 883

Proclamation 4034 of March 4, 1971

Save Your Vision Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The greatest tragedy of blindness is that it may be needless.

Much can be done to preserve sight by regular and thorough eye examinations, beginning early in life, and by promoting eye safety on the job, in schools, and at home.

Early detection can prevent glaucoma and prompt treatment can restore the vision lost because of cataracts. Healthy tissue can be transplanted to restore sight.

On the other hand, there are many causes of blindness or visual disability that science cannot yet prevent or treat. Only research can provide the answers to visual problems such as disorders of the retina, inherited vision defects, and blindness from long-standing diabetes.

The Federal Government conducts and supports such research in the recently established National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health and in laboratories across the Nation. This effort by the Government complements the many excellent activities of private and voluntary groups in supporting research and in providing services to the blind and visually handicapped.

In an effort to make Americans better aware of how sight may be preserved, the Congress by a joint resolution approved December 30, 1963 (77 Stat. 629), requested the President to proclaim the first week in March of each year as Save Your Vision Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of March 7, 1971, as Save Your Vision Week; and I invite appropriate officials of State and local governments to issue similar proclamations.

I call upon all our citizens to join in this observance by learning how visual disabilities may be prevented and by seeking professional attention for themselves and their families for vision problems. I also encourage them, and the communications media, the health care professions, and other interested organizations, to support research aimed at conquering those diseases and conditions against which we now have no defense.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, March 1, 1971

Red Cross Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4033 - 85 Stat. 882

Proclamation 4033 of March 4, 1971

Red Cross Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The highest ideal of mankind is love, and the great challenge is to infuse love into the decisions and actions of daily living. "Love cannot be a mere abstraction," the American religious leader Mary Baker Eddy wrote nearly a century ago; we must "make strong demands on love, call for active witnesses to prove it, and noble sacrifices and grand achievements as its results." At about the same time, her contemporary Clara Barton was founding an organization that meets this challenge superbly—the American Red Cross.

Today the hands of the Red Cross reach across the Nation and, through the League of Red Cross Societies, around the world, to bring relief wherever disaster, disease, misfortune, or war causes human suffering. The American Red Cross is chartered by Congress but its financing is purely voluntary, compelled by compassion alone. The success of its vital humanitarian mission rests upon generous gifts of time and money from millions of Americans.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, and Honorary Chairman of the American National Red Cross, do hereby designate March 1971, as Red Cross Month, a month when the organization will appeal for your active help. I urge every American to measure his contribution of dollars and skills by the same rule that governs the work of the Red Cross—the Golden Rule.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON