Sunday, April 18, 1971

Earth Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4042 - 85 Stat. 892

Proclamation 4042 of April 2, 1971

Earth Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Few concerns facing America and the world today are more compelling than the quality of our physical environment. All that we do, all that we hope to achieve for ourselves, all that we hope to create for our children will go for nothing if the world itself is made unfit to live in. The question of what we do with our environment is a matter of cosmic consequence; there is a limit to how long the matter rests merely with man, and if that limit is exceeded, the success of man as an earth creature may itself be limited by forces he no longer controls.

The earth and its atmosphere are a closed system. They are finite. The good water cannot purify itself indefinitely. The good air cannot cleanse itself endlessly. And the good earth cannot sustain and repair the injustices of man forever. Man must help to put his own earthly house in order.

We have made a beginning in this. But we have only begun. Now there must be a conscious, sustained effort by every American and, we might hope, by every citizen of the world if our posterity are not to look back in sorrow and wonder why, when God had created the earth and seen that it was good, man did not agree and leave it that way.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the period of April 18 through April 24, 1971, as Earth Week.

I call upon the Governors of the several States to encourage observance of this period and its purposes through appropriate ceremonies and to give special consideration to means of educating our citizens to the preservation of our environment.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Wednesday, April 14, 1971

Pan American Day and Pan American Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4046 - 85 Stat. 896

Proclamation 4046 of April 12, 1971

Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

April 14 marks the eighty-first anniversary of the founding of the world's oldest regional grouping of nations, the inter-American system now called the Organization of American States.

The name of the system has changed over the years, but its objectives have not. It was Simon Bolivar's dream of 150 years ago—that the freedom of the New World would be the hope of the universe—which inspired the creation of the inter-American system. And it is that aspiration which still unites the peoples of the Western Hemisphere in the structure of peace and the pursuit of progress, transcending our diversity of languages and cultures.

The United States, as the oldest republic in the Americas and a founding member of the inter-American system, has long been pledged to lend its full weight to the work of realizing Bolivar's dream. I have renewed that pledge for the Seventies, with special emphasis on equal partnership and full participation for all the New World nations.

The Organization of American States has long outlived the farsighted men who laid the foundations of hemispheric cooperation eight decades ago. It has gained steadily in stature as a force for a better life in the Americas. With our support it can continue to meet the challenges of the present and enlarge the opportunities of the future.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, April 14, 1971, as Pan American Day, and the week beginning April 11 and ending April 17 as Pan American Week; and I call upon the Governors of the fifty States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Commissioner of the District of Columbia, and appropriate officials of all other areas under the flag of the United States to issue similar proclamations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Thursday, April 1, 1971

Cancer Control Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4039 - 85 Stat. 889

Proclamation 4039 of March 29, 1971

Cancer Control Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

This Nation may stand on the threshold of one of the greatest triumphs in human history—the conquest of cancer. If we can now achieve that great goal, we will have lifted from the human family forever the pain, the suffering and the unbearable fear of that most dreaded of all diseases.

Decades of research have brought us at last to the moment when scientists can look with renewed hope toward victories in the prevention and treatment of cancer. This moment presents an opportunity that we dare not pass up. The lives of millions now living and countless more yet unborn can be touched—and saved—by what we do.

I have proposed a bold new effort to bring us closer to the goal we seek. I have asked for an additional $100 million this year to press toward the conquest of cancer. I know that money alone cannot guarantee victory in a struggle as complex and difficult as this. But I also know that this search can be quickened by great strides. When they occur, we must be ready to seize upon them and grasp, if we can, the prize that has been sought for so long.

Just as the whole world could benefit from this effort, the whole Nation must be behind it. The Congress, by joint resolution of March 28, 1938 (52 Stat. 148) requested that the President issue annually a proclamation setting aside the month of April as Cancer Control Month.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April 1971 as Cancer Control Month, and I invite the Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of all other areas under the United States flag to issue similar proclamations.

To give new emphasis to this serious problem, and to encourage the determination of the American people to resolve it, I also ask the medical and allied health professions, the communications industries, and all other interested persons and groups to unite during the appointed month in public reaffirmation of this Nation's efforts to control cancer.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentyninth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON