Monday, May 31, 1971

Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4056 - 85 Stat. 907

Proclamation 4056 of May 27, 1971

Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

It is a tradition of our Nation, as it is a tradition of most nations, to pay homage to those who have fallen in defense of our land, our people, and our principles. These men and women honor America by their sacrifice. It is for America to honor them by its devotion to those purposes for which they perished.

We cannot dismiss with easy platitudes the debt which the deaths of our countrymen lays upon us. And while the declaration of noble sentiments, the placing of flowers and the shedding of tears of remembrance can pay deserved tribute to their sacrifices, these by themselves cannot redeem those sacrifices. So let us bear witness to the plain truth that we can only insure that our soldiers and sailors and marines and airmen have not died in vain by resolving, as citizens of the land for which they died, that we shall not ourselves live in vain.

It is a simple matter to make war, and a difficult matter to make a peace. The history of man confirms this, for it records few periods when men have not somewhere in the world waged war on their fellow men. Confirmed in this truth, we know that our concern in America must be to move hand in hand with men of all nations to make the world safe for humanity. In this manner we can insure that those who died for us did not die in vain, that out of war has come redemption, and out of the search for redemption has come a true and just and lasting peace.

To manifest the concern of the American people for the purposes of peace, Congress by a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period during such day when the people of the United States might unite in such supplication.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 31, 1971, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o'clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in such prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the tragic struggle in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day, instead of during the customary forenoon period, on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, May 30, 1971

National Peace Corps Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4057 - 85 Stat. 909

Proclamation 4057 of May 28, 1971

National Peace Corps Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Peace Corps, which has sent more than 45,000 volunteers overseas to serve in nearly 70 developing countries.

Few governmental organizations have so inspired and captured the imaginations of Americans both young and old. I therefore take special pleasure in complying with Senate Joint Resolution 29, requesting that the week beginning May 30, 1971, and ending June 5, 1971, be designated as National Peace Corps Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of May 30 through June 5, 1971, as National Peace Corps Week; and I invite the Governors of the States and appropriate local government officials to issue similar proclamations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, May 22, 1971

National Maritime Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4043 - 85 Stat. 893

Proclamation 4043 of April 6, 1971

National Maritime Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

A strong American merchant marine is essential to the Nation's economic prosperity and military security.

Under the Merchant Marine Act of 1970, the Nation's maritime industry can and must move forward with the task of rebuilding our merchant marine fleet, improving the competitive position of our shipbuilding industry, and restoring the United States to its rightful proud position in the shipping lanes of the world.

All elements of the maritime industry should utilize the opportunity provided by that Act to develop an American merchant marine fully capable of providing the modem, efficient services which are indispensable both to our foreign commerce and to our security.

To remind Americans of the important role which the merchant marine plays in our national life, the Congress in 1933 designated the anniversary of the first transatlantic voyage by a steamship, the SS Savannah, on May 22, 1819, as National Maritime Day, and requested the President to issue a proclamation annually in observance of that day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby urge the people of the United States to honor our American merchant marine on May 22, 1971, by displaying the flag of the United States at their homes and other suitable places, and I request that all ships sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, May 21, 1971

National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4041 - 85 Stat. 891

Proclamation 4041 of March 31, 1971

National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The past growth and prosperity of the United States relied heavily on an interconnected, diversified transportation network which linked its cities and its citizens. Our commerce prospered from the ever-increasing proximity of the markets; our citizens, from the availability and accessibility of the great productive wealth of the Nation.

We are now entering into a new era in transportation—an era in which our national mobility will demand the continued conquest of time and space, yet our national conscience will no longer permit irreparable damage to our land, our environment, or the social fabric of our communities. It is in this light that transportation faces its challenge of the future.

To meet that challenge, we will need a truly balanced transportation system—a system that provides our citizens with the ability to choose the most efficient means of transportation at the least possible cost to themselves and to the environment. I ask for the help of all citizens in achieving this goal.

In recognition of the importance of our transportation system to our economy, our national security and our daily lives, and as a tribute to the men and women who move goods and people throughout our land, the Congress by a joint resolution approved May 16, 1957, requested the President to proclaim annually the third Friday of May each year as National Defense Transportation Day, and by a joint resolution approved May 14, 1962, requested the President to proclaim annually the week of May in which that Friday falls as National Transportation Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Friday, May 21, 1971, as National Defense Transportation Day, and the week beginning May 16, 1971, as National Transportation Week.

During National Transportation Week, I ask that the people of this Nation join with the Department of Transportation and also with State and local officials in reevaluating our goals and reaffirming our commitment to a balanced transportation system for these United States.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, May 16, 1971

World Trade Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4047 - 85 Stat. 897

Proclamation 4047 of April 15, 1971

World Trade Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Trade between nations is an expression of mutual dependence and good will. The international flow of goods is an instrument of world cooperation that fosters the well-being of peoples.

A strong position in world trade and investment has become a basic pillar of the American economy. It also helps raise the standards of living of other peoples of the world by making more widely available our advanced technologies and our capital.

Now, more than ever before, the United States must seek to strengthen its role as a key supplier to the global marketplace. An increased international effort will accelerate foreign exchange earnings, strengthen the position of the dollar abroad and enable us to meet our responsibilities to the international community. It will also provide added stimulus to our economy at home as it moves towards our national objective of full employment through increased productivity.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 16, 1971, as World Trade Week, and I call upon the business community and the American people to consider world trade as an important national priority which warrants their attention and productive efforts. I request that appropriate Federal, State, and local officials cooperate in observing that week.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Small Business Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4045 - 85 Stat. 895

Proclamation 4045 of April 8, 1971

Small Business Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The American tradition of independent enterprise is as old as our society itself. The freemen who tended little stores, ran coastwise shipping, traded in furs, or made candles helped this tradition put down deep roots early in our history. "What most astonishes me," wrote de Tocqueville as he took the measure of our young nation in the 1830s, "is not so much the marvelous grandeur of some undertakings as the innumerable multitude of small ones." From such beginnings, small business has grown into one of the principal economic forces in this, the world's greatest industrial nation.

Today—its name aside—small business is big. Nineteen United States firms in twenty are small businesses. They do nearly three-fourths of the total volume of sales and one-third of all manufacturing. For the industry and resourcefulness which millions of Americans invest in them as owners and employees, they return not only profits but also the rich rewards of self-reliance. They contribute to the wide diversity of our society and our economy, and they offer members of disadvantaged minority groups an open door into full participation in the Nation's prosperity—a door through which black Americans, Spanish-speaking Americans, Indians, and other minority enterprisers are now passing in increasing numbers.

But if small business is to realize its full potential in the years ahead, it needs and deserves wholehearted support from citizens and the business community as a whole, as well as the strong encouragement it already receives from government.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning May 16, 1971, as Small Business Week. I ask all Americans and their business organizations to join with me during this week in paying tribute to the accomplishments of small business and in helping small business toward continued strength and success.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, May 9, 1971

Mother's Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4051 - 85 Stat. 902

Proclamation 4051 of May 7, 1971

Mother's Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Throughout this Nation's history, American mothers have played a very special role—helping to pioneer the land, enriching our community life, and bringing deeper meaning to the lives of their husbands and children.

In recent years we have come to appreciate more than ever before the influential contribution mothers can make in the extended community beyond the home. But even as new horizons are opened for many mothers, each mother's responsibility to her children still defines her central role.

In our society, we want to see each person fulfill his unique potential. It is fitting therefore that we recognize and honor the part that mothers play in the development of their children—even as we welcome new opportunities for mothers to contribute to the Nation's life.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914, has set aside the second Sunday of May of each year as a day on which we honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their own families, to their communities, and to the Nation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1971, be observed throughout the land as Mother's Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day as a public expression of love and respect for the mothers of our country.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Voluntary Overseas Aid Week and Human Development Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4053 - 85 Stat. 904

Proclamation 4053 of May 11, 1971

Voluntary Overseas Aid Week and Human Development Month

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

During this month of May 1971, we take grateful note of the twenty-five years of constructive leadership provided by the Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid.

United States voluntary agencies, working in close association with the Advisory Committee, have through the years given needed assistance to promote economic and social development in over one hundred countries of the world.

The International Walk for Development, which has recently taken place, focused on the need to continue humanitarian assistance and economic development through voluntary action.

It is fitting that we commend the good will of the people of our country, manifested by our overseas programs of development and relief, and the humanitarian work and interest of these nonprofit service organizations.

To this end, the Congress has requested the President to designate the week beginning May 9, 1971, as Voluntary Overseas Aid Week and the month of May 1971 as Human Development Month.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning May 9, 1971, as Voluntary Overseas Aid Week and the month of May 1971 as Human Development Month.

I request the appropriate agencies of the Federal Government, and I urge all our people, to observe that week and month with activities which will give merited prominence to the significant contributions which our voluntary agencies are making to the well-being of peoples in other lands.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Multiple Sclerosis Society Annual Hope Chest Appeal Weeks - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4052 - 85 Stat. 903

Proclamation 4052 of May 8, 1971

National Multiple Sclerosis Society Annual Hope Chest Appeal Weeks

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Great progress has been made in the fight against disease and disability during the past few decades. Now, with the major infectious diseases under control, medical research is giving increased attention to diseases which originate within the body such as the disabling neurological disorders.

Among the illnesses which present the greatest challenge at the present time is multiple sclerosis. Of the hundreds of thousands of Americans who suffer from diseases of the central nervous system, many are the victims of this crippling illness.

Advances in medicine result from the combined efforts of private physicians, research scientists—both in and outside of government—and voluntary health agencies such as the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, which was established over 20 years ago.

To focus the attention of the American people on the national effort to find the cause of multiple sclerosis and its cure, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 28, 1970, has requested the President to proclaim the period from May 9, 1971, Mother's Day, through June 20, 1971, Father's Day, as National Multiple Sclerosis Society Annual Hope Chest Appeal Weeks.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the period from May 9, 1971, through June 20, 1971, as National Multiple Sclerosis Society Annual Hope Chest Appeal Weeks. I invite the Governors of the States and the appropriate officials of other areas under the United States flag to issue similar proclamations.

I urge the people of this Nation and their educational, philanthropic, scientific, medical, and health care professions and organizations to join in providing the assistance and resources necessary to discover the cause of multiple sclerosis and its cure and to help alleviate the suffering of persons stricken by this disease.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, May 2, 1971

National Employ The Older Worker Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4050 - 85 Stat. 901

Proclamation 4050 of May 5, 1971

National Employ The Older Worker Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The skills, the wisdom and the strength of older Americans constitute a great resource for our country. Unfortunately, it is a resource which has not been adequately used. Too many of our older citizens are denied opportunities for employment simply because of their age. Yet each year thousands of older workers demonstrate in convincing fashion that age is not a bar to efficient and productive labor.

Often, in fact, just the opposite is the case. For the older worker brings to his job a range and depth of experience which makes his efforts especially valuable.

The more I learn about older men and women, the more convinced I become of this central fact: what those who have reached retirement age desire most of all in life is the chance to continue their service to society. They want to be useful members of the community—independent and self-reliant citizens who are regarded as full participants in our national life.

I believe very strongly that these men and women, who have already given so much to our country, deserve every chance to fulfill this desire. They will benefit enormously from such opportunities, and our society will benefit even more.

The Congress, by joint resolution approved December 28, 1970, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the first full calendar week in May of 1971, as "National Employ the Older Worker Week."

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the period May 2 through May 8, 1971, as National Employ the Older Worker Week.

I urge every employer and employee organization, other organizations officially concerned with employment, and all the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs designed to increase employment opportunities for older workers and to bring about the elimination of discrimination in employment because of age.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Clean Waters for America Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4049 - 85 Stat. 900

Proclamation 4049 of April 30, 1971

Clean Waters for America Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The United States has a proud record of facing up to great challenges by taking the decisive action required to meet them. Perhaps the greatest challenge to America in the 1970s will be ending the wasteful and destructive practices which have so seriously degraded our environment.

For too many years, we Americans have taken our natural resources for granted, confident that the abundant land of our forefathers would always provide enough fresh air, good water, and open space for every need.

The truth is that no new sources of fresh water have been uncovered in America for many years. At the same time, population growth and technological advances have tremendously increased both the overall and the per capita consumption of water, while inadequate treatment of wastes has contaminated more and more of our water resources.

We must act quickly and effectively to protect our waters from further deterioration and to treat wastes so the water may be used again. Only in this way will future generations of Americans be assured of an adequate supply of clean water.

To call attention to the need for a continuous program for the control and elimination of water pollution, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 28, 1970, requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the first full calendar week in May of 1971 as Clean Waters for America Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning May 2, 1971, as Clean Waters for America Week.

I urge all Americans, and interested groups and organizations, to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and educational programs, and to support community. State, and Federal efforts to clean up our national waterways and to adopt new habits and practices which will contribute to the enhancement of water quality in this country.

I also invite the Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the Commissioner of the District of Columbia to provide for the observance of this week.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, May 1, 1971

Senior Citizens Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4048 - 85 Stat. 898

Proclamation 4048 of April 20, 1971

Senior Citizens Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From its beginnings, the American Nation has been dedicated to the constant pursuit of better tomorrows. Yet, for many of our 20 million older Americans the "tomorrows" that arrive with their later years have not been better. Rather than days of reward, happiness, and opportunity, they have too often been days of disappointment, loneliness, and anxiety. It is imperative that this situation be changed.

Some of the problems of older Americans have their roots in economic causes. For example, the incidence of poverty is more than twice as great among older Americans as among those under 65. This is especially tragic because many of these people did not become poor until they reached their later years. Moreover, the economic gap between the age groups has been accompanied in recent years by a growing sense of social and psychological separation, so that too often our older citizens are regarded as an unwanted generation.

The generation of Americans over 65 have lived through a particularly challenging time in world history. The fact that our country has come through the first two-thirds of the twentieth century as a strong and growing Nation is the direct result of their devotion and their resourcefulness. We owe them a great deal—not only for what they have done in the past but also for what they are continuing to do today. Perhaps the greatest error which younger Americans make in dealing with the elderly is to underestimate the energy and skill which they can still contribute to their country.

During the last year, several hundred thousand older people wrote to officials of the Federal Government and told us in their own words— some sad, some hopeful—about what they need and what they desire. We learned once again that what they seek most of all is a continuing role in shaping the destiny of their society. We must find new ways for helping them play such a role—an undertaking which will require a basic change in the attitudes of many Americans who are not yet elderly.

As a part of our effort to achieve such changes, our Nation each year observes the month of May as Senior Citizens Month. This is a time when we make a special effort to thank our older citizens for all they have contributed to America's progress. It is also a time for asking with special force whether they are now sharing in that progress as fully as they deserve and desire and for renewing our efforts to help them live proud and fulfilling lives.

Senior Citizens Month, 1971, will be a particularly important time for such endeavors, for this is the year of the White House Conference on Aging. The Governor of every State has issued a call for a State Conference on Aging to be held during May. From these State conferences will come policy recommendations which will be submitted to the White House Conference in Washington next November.

I know that the work of these State conferences during Senior Citizens Month—like the work of the White House Conference next autumn—will be undertaken with a high sense of discipline, commitment, and imagination. The Nation owes no less to those who have given so much to its development.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate May, 1971, as Senior Citizens Month. The theme for this month will be Toward a National Policy on Aging.

I am deeply grateful to the Governors for their concern and participation in this observance. I urge officials of government at all levels—national, State, and local—and of voluntary organizations and private groups to give special attention to the problems of older Americans during this period.

I also call upon individual citizens of all ages to take full advantage of this opportunity to share in designing a better future—for those who are now numbered among our older citizens and for all who will be among that number someday.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Loyalty Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4036 - 85 Stat. 885

Proclamation 4036 of March 10, 1971

Loyalty Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In this time, as throughout our history, the American nation rests fully and finally upon the loyalty of the American people.

Every day Americans around the globe bear witness to their national allegiance. In doing so, some bear final witness by giving up their lives for the life of this Nation. Not all are called to that extremity. But all are called to that degree of devotion. For that reason it is fitting that we set aside one day in the year when every citizen may pause to reflect on his own debt to the devotion of other Americans, and to bear witness in every appropriate way to his own loyalty.

To that end the Congress by a joint resolution of July 18, 1958, has designated May 1 of each year as Loyalty Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation inviting the people of the United States to observe such day with appropriate ceremonies.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do call upon the people of the United States, and upon all patriotic, civic, and educational organizations, to observe Saturday, May 1, 1971 as Loyalty Day, with appropriate ceremonies in which all of us may join in a reaffirmation of our loyalty to the United States of America.

I also call upon appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day as a manifestation of our loyalty to the Nation which that flag symbolizes.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Law Day, U.S.A. - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4032 - 85 Stat. 881

Proclamation 4032 of March 2, 1971

Law Day, U.S.A., 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Change is the immutable first law of nature, and governments reveal themselves most in the manner by which they provide for change. History is littered with the remains of governments that failed to meet this challenge: of those that gave too great a scope to unbridled impulse, and of those that gave too little scope to the human spirit.

Between these two extremes—between the tyranny of anarchy and the tyranny of totalitarianism—the law has its dominion. Our forefathers established government and founded a free nation on that high place. They gave us laws that could be changed by orderly process so that the nation and its people might remain free.

This ability to change by orderly process is essential to democratic government, for the success of such a form of government depends upon a capacity constantly to resolve the basic paradox of a system of liberty under law: that the supremacy of the law rests on its recognition of the supremacy of the people.

The continuing success of America testifies to the wisdom with which the founders of this nation addressed this paradox, and to the legal skill with which they resolved it.

It is fitting that we honor not merely the law, but the lawgivers, and that we honor above all those citizens who keep the law.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby urge the people of the United States to observe Saturday, May 1, 1971, as Law Day in the United States of America with appropriate public ceremonies and by the reaffirmation of their dedication to our form of government and the supremacy of law in our lives. I especially urge the legal profession, the schools and educational institutions, civic and service organizations, all media of public information, and the courts to take the lead in sponsoring and participating in appropriate observances throughout the nation.

And, as requested by the Congress, I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all public buildings on that day.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 2d day of March, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON