Sunday, July 25, 1971

National Star Route Mail Carriers Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4063 - 85 Stat. 914

Proclamation 4063 of July 1, 1971

National Star Route Mail Carriers Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In 1845 Congress provided that future mail transportation contracts were to be awarded by the Postmaster General "to the lowest bidder, tendering sufficient guarantees for faithful performance, without other reference to the mode of such transportation than may be necessary to provide for the due celerity, certainty, and security of such transportation."

That statute not only opened a colorful chapter in American postal service, but also set forth a bold new standard for transportation of the mails: "Celerity, Certainty, and Security," Bids from private contractors under the 1845 law were soon marked on the books of the Post Office Department with three stars, signifying the three points of that motto. Over time, the bids themselves became known as "star bids," and eventually the contract service for transporting the mail by all modes, except boats and railways, came to be known as "star route mail service."

Since the inception of this service 126 years ago, star route carriers have performed an important task for the American people, transporting the mail over thousands of miles of roads where regular postal service was unavailable. In recent years, the star route carriers have also made an important contribution to rural America, often supplementing the efforts of the regular carriers.

In recognition of the dedicated public service of our star route carriers, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 583, has requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the last full week in July of 1971 as National Star Route Mail Carriers Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning July 25, 1971, as National Star Route Mail Carriers Week.

I urge the Postal Service, and all interested groups and organizations, to observe that week with appropriate recognition to the Nation's star route mail carriers.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Farm Safety Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4044 - 85 Stat. 894

Proclamation 4044 of April 7, 1971

National Farm Safety Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Primitive man's first discoveries about cultivating the land came by chance, and for thousands of years thereafter agriculture progressed only slowly out of the realm of guesswork. Even in the early days of this Nation, when we were a people of farmers and planters, the process of coaxing life out of the earth remained far more an art than a science. But today American agriculture has become a fully realized technology largely subject to human planning and control—a bountiful producer of food, clothing, and the makings of the good life for America and the world.

Thus there is sharp irony in the fact that this great industry, so accomplished in the scientific nurture of plant and animal life, remains among the industries in which human life is most precarious and accident rates are highest. The farm and ranch environment abounds in potential hazards—powerful machinery, exposed working conditions, physically demanding jobs—but experience has shown that caution, common sense, and protective equipment can do much to counter them and keep accidents and injuries to a minimum. All who live and work on America's farms and ranches owe it to themselves, their families, and the nation that depends on them, to put safety first. Let us set the goal of eliminating chance from rural life just as we have learned to exclude it from agricultural production.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of July 25, 1971, as National Farm Safety Week. I urge farm families and all in the rural community to make every effort to reduce accidents occurring at work, home, in recreation and on the highway.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Wednesday, July 21, 1971

World Law Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4060 - 85 Stat. 911

Proclamation 4060 of June 17, 1971

World Law Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From the time more than 25 centuries ago when a Hebrew prophet wrote, "The Lord is our judge . . . our lawgiver . . . our king; he will save us," Western civilization's sense of salvation has been intimately related to its vision of the universal rule of law in the affairs of men. We in the United States have special reason to cherish this vision, for the freedom, the order, and the abundance which we enjoy are fruits of its application. The great principle that the people are sovereign, and that the law they make is supreme, has operated with such signal success in our country's history that Americans are turning increasingly to the compelling logic of putting it to work in the world community as well. People of many other nations and cultures are doing likewise.

At the same time technology is shrinking the globe so that the sense of common destiny and common danger, the sense that "my country is the world; and my countrymen are mankind," is no longer fancy but compelling fact for the whole human race. More and more, it becomes a matter of prime importance that principle and not mere power should govern in this country called Earth.

We can see many heartening evidences that law is becoming stronger and more just around the world under the pressures which reason and necessity exert. Within the nations, human rights and ecological wisdom continue to gain stature in the law. Among the nations, security and cooperation—on every front from space to the seabeds—are being enhanced through negotiations, treaties, and conventions. The United Nations is entering its second quarter of a century, and many other international organizations are working effectively through and for world law.

Also playing a constructive role are those organizations which are made up not of countries but of individual men and women, joined together in the interest of the law as citizens of their countries and of the world. One of the most important of these is the World Peace Through Law Center, founded in 1963, which this summer will hold its Fifth World Conference on World Peace Through Law at Belgrade, Yugoslavia. July 21, the date when thousands of lawyers and jurists from around the world will convene for this conference, will be observed in many nations as World Law Day—an observance in which I know the American people, a people who love the law, will want to join.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim July 21, 1971, as World Law Day. I call on every American to reflect that day on the sacredness of the law in American tradition. And I urge each American to join with millions of his fellow men around the world in heightened recognition of the importance of the rule of law in international affairs to our goal of a stable peace.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 17th day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Tuesday, July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4067 - 85 Stat. 919

Proclamation 4067 of July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The United States has special reason to remember July 20, 1969, with pride, for it was on this date that two of our Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., landed on the moon. Armstrong's message, "The Eagle has landed," marked the achievement of what men had dreamed of over the centuries: to navigate through space and land on another celestial body. Soon after their landing at the Sea of Tranquility, both astronauts walked on the surface of the moon, placed an American flag on its soil, gathered samples of soil and rocks, and emplaced scientific recording equipment. Man's exploration of the moon had begun.

Since the historic flight of Apollo 11, American astronauts have extended man's exploration of the moon to the Ocean of Storms with Apollo 12 and the hills of Frau Mauro with Apollo 14, with rich scientific return. Next week, Apollo 15 is scheduled to head for another different region of the moon to explore the base of the 12,000-foot Apennine Mountains and the rim of the 1,300 foot canyon-like Hadley Rille. Thus, two years after the first landing on the moon, other brave men are following in the footsteps of Armstrong and Aldrin to explore the unknown and advance scientific knowledge for the benefit of all mankind.

To commemorate the anniversary of the first moon walk on July 20, 1969, and to accord recognition to the many achievements of the national space program, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 101, has requested that the President issue a proclamation designating July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day, I urge all Americans, and interested groups and organizations, to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs designed to show their pride in this great national achievement.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Moon Walk Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4067 - 85 Stat. 919

Proclamation 4067 of July 20, 1971

National Moon Walk Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The United States has special reason to remember July 20, 1969, with pride, for it was on this date that two of our Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., landed on the moon. Armstrong's message, "The Eagle has landed," marked the achievement of what men had dreamed of over the centuries: to navigate through space and land on another celestial body. Soon after their landing at the Sea of Tranquility, both astronauts walked on the surface of the moon, placed an American flag on its soil, gathered samples of soil and rocks, and emplaced scientific recording equipment. Man's exploration of the moon had begun.

Since the historic flight of Apollo 11, American astronauts have extended man's exploration of the moon to the Ocean of Storms with Apollo 12 and the hills of Frau Mauro with Apollo 14, with rich scientific return. Next week, Apollo 15 is scheduled to head for another different region of the moon to explore the base of the 12,000-foot Apennine Mountains and the rim of the 1,300 foot canyon-like Hadley Rille. Thus, two years after the first landing on the moon, other brave men are following in the footsteps of Armstrong and Aldrin to explore the unknown and advance scientific knowledge for the benefit of all mankind.

To commemorate the anniversary of the first moon walk on July 20, 1969, and to accord recognition to the many achievements of the national space program, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 101, has requested that the President issue a proclamation designating July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate July 20, 1971, as National Moon Walk Day, I urge all Americans, and interested groups and organizations, to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs designed to show their pride in this great national achievement.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, July 18, 1971

Captive Nations Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4065 - 85 Stat. 917

Proclamation 4065 of July 9, 1971

Captive Nations Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From its beginnings as a nation, the United States has maintained a commitment to the principles of national independence and human liberty. In keeping with this tradition, it remains an essential purpose of our people to encourage the constructive changes which lead to the growth of human freedom. We understand and sympathize with the efforts of oppressed peoples everywhere to realize this inalienable right.

By a joint resolution approved on July 17, 1959, the Eighty-Sixth Congress authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation each year designating the third week in July as Captive Nations Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning July 18, 1971 as Captive Nations Week. I invite the people of the United States of America to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities, and I urge them to give renewed devotion to the just aspirations of all peoples for national independence and human liberty.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, July 4, 1971

National Safe Boating Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4028 - 85 Stat. 876

Proclamation 4028 of January 28, 1971

National Safe Boating Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

More Americans each year are choosing boating as the ideal way to relax with their families and friends. All too often, however, what starts out as a pleasant cruise ends in tragedy because boatmen fail to teach their families to swim, fail to properly equip their craft with life preservers and other protective devices, or fail to instruct their passengers on the use of such devices prior to a boating cruise.

Every year, about 1,300 lives are lost in boating accidents. These fatalities can be reduced and boating made more pleasurable if those who engage in it will emphasize boating safety rules.

Recognizing the need for that emphasis, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved June 4, 1958 (72 Stat. 179), has requested the President to proclaim annually the week which includes July 4 as National Safe Boating Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning July 4, 1971, as National Safe Boating Week.

I urge all who use our waterways to acquire those skills essential to their own safety and that of others and to apply them carefully.

I also invite the Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico to provide for the observance of this week.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Thursday, July 1, 1971

National Postal Service Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4061 - 85 Stat. 912

Proclamation 4061 of June 19, 1971

National Postal Service Day

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For nearly two hundred years the people of this country have been served by a national post office. When America was growing, and our people were pushing the frontier out across the land, the United States Post Office helped bind our people together in one nation.

As the Nation has grown and its needs have changed, the Post Office has grown and changed to meet those new needs. The Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 is a part of this change, heralding a new United States Postal Service. The new Service will provide management and methods appropriate to a great and vital communications system in the twentieth century. Behind the new Service, as from the beginning, the high ideals of public service and fidelity to the public well-being, which for so long has distinguished the Post Office, will continue.

On July 1, 1971, the United States Postal Service will begin operation as an independent establishment of the executive branch of the United States Government. It is appropriate to set aside that day to give recognition to the contributions made through the years by the men and women of the Post Office who have served the Nation so faithfully and to mark the inauguration of the United States Postal Service.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, July 1, 1971, as National Postal Service Day.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 19th day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON