Sunday, September 19, 1971

National Highway Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4072 - 85 Stat. 924

Proclamation 4072 of August 12, 1971

National Highway Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

When the Erie Canal opened in 1825 it quickly acquired the slogan "A Cent and a Half a Mile, a Mile and a Half an Hour." Our toll roads now cost the traveller nearly the same amount, but the trip from New York to Buffalo that once took five days by barge at a mile and a half per hour now takes less than ten hours by automobile and can be travelled at 65 miles per hour.

The highways built since the Erie Canal have become the dominant element in our national transportation system and a key force in virtually every phase of modern American life. These roads not only provide avenues of commerce for our nation's economy, but also help to make available the services and pleasures of our daily existence. Our rapidly developing 42,500 mile System of Interstate and Defense Highway is especially helpful for the traveller who wishes to visit recreational areas and historic sites that previously were known only through photographs.

In our present day, by serving as the conduit for a large proportion of mass transit in urban areas, highways go far toward meeting our needs for the best possible transportation. In the future, as a part of a balanced system of growth, they should be a key part of an integrated and comprehensive transportation plan for these urban areas, linking other vital means of transportation by air, rail and water. In this proliferation of American highways we find a clear reflection of the good which men can do by planning and working together in common needs.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 19, 1971, as National Highway Week. I urge Federal, State, and local government officials, as well as highway industry and other organizations, to hold appropriate ceremonies during that week in recognition of what highway transportation means to our country.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, September 17, 1971

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4077 - 85 Stat. 935

Proclamation 4077 of August 30, 1971

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The Constitution of the United States, as Woodrow Wilson observed early in this century, "is not a mere lawyers' document: it is a vehicle of life, and its spirit is always the spirit of the age."

To each new generation of American citizens, this lesson comes afresh. To the young of today, it has come dramatically this year with the passage of the Twenty-Sixth Amendment, granting full voting rights to those between 18 and 21 years of age.

As citizens of all ages join in welcoming these young people into the electorate, we can also unite with them in recognizing that our Constitution does have a special relevance for every age. Enduring and timeless, yet it is vital and life-giving, affirming as no other written document can that the ideals upon which men acted in the early days of our Republic are as essential now as they were then.

In commemoration of the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, and in recognition of all who had attained citizenship during the year, the Congress on February 29, 1952, approved a joint resolution (66 Stat. 9) setting aside the seventeenth day of September of each year as Citizenship Day. On August 2, 1956, the Congress approved a second joint resolution (70 Stat. 932), requesting the President to designate the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as Constitution Week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on Citizenship Day, September 17, 1971. I also counsel and urge Federal, State, and local officials, as well as religious, civic, educational, and other interested organizations to make arrangements for the observance of that day with appropriate ceremonies.

I also designate the period beginning September 17 and ending September 23, 1971, as Constitution Week; and I urge the people of the United States to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities in their schools and churches, and in other suitable places, to the end that our citizens, whether they be naturalized or natural born, may have a better understanding of the Constitution and of the rights and responsibilities of United States citizenship.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, September 12, 1971

National Hispanic Heritage Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4079 - 85 Stat. 937

Proclamation 4079 of September 13, 1971

National Hispanic Heritage Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From the earliest explorations of the New World, men and women of Hispanic origin and descent have contributed significantly to the development of our American nationality. The geographic .names of our country fully attest to that contribution. In fact, the oldest city in the United States, St. Augustine, Florida, was founded by Spanish explorers in 1565—406 years ago. Amerigo Vespucci, the man whose name graces our land, came to this hemisphere on a Spanish ship.

Our Hispanic heritage touches our everyday lives as well—our music, our architecture, our currency, and our cuisine. The voyages of Spanish explorers to the New World are a common starting point for the study of American history in our schools. Americans of Hispanic origin and descent have served our country with distinction throughout our State, local, and national governments—and continue to do so today.

In the past, men and women of Hispanic origin and descent helped to discover, develop, and people this land. We are fortunate that today they are our own people.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of Congress approved September 17, 1968, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 12, 1971, and ending September 18, 1971, as National Hispanic Heritage Week. I call upon the people of the United States, especially the educational community, to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities which call attention to the richness of our Hispanic heritage and the contributions to our diverse society by our citizens of Hispanic origin.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON