Monday, October 25, 1971

Veterans Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4083 - 85 Stat. 942

Proclamation 4083 of September 23, 1971

Veterans Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

There are no persons more deeply devoted to peace than those who have directly experienced the horrors of war. And there is no group of Americans who have done more to prepare the way for lasting peace than those who have actively resisted the forces of aggression and tyranny as members of our Armed Forces.

Veterans Day, 1971, affords us a special opportunity to pay tribute to our Nation's veterans, and to express our gratitude and acknowledge our debt for all they have given to their country. But our observance of Veterans Day must not stop there. For we honor their devotion best when we renew our own devotion to their ideals: to courage and selflessness and loyalty and honor—and, above all, to lasting peace.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all Americans to join in commemorating Monday, October 25, 1971, as Veterans Day. I ask that all Americans join with me in paying tribute on that day to all those who have served this country as members of its Armed Forces in the past and to all those who are performing such service at home and abroad at this hour.

As a mark of our respect for these men and women, I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day and I request all Government officials to cooperate with civic and patriotic organizations in conducting appropriate public ceremonies throughout the land.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 24, 1971

American Education Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4090 - 85 Stat. 948

Proclamation 4090 of October 15, 1971

American Education Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Historian Henry Steele Commager has written that "No other people ever demanded so much of education as have the Americans. None other was ever served so well by its schools and educators."

What has been a characteristic of our history is even more dominant in our lives today. A system of education that has conferred inestimable benefits upon generation after generation of American citizens—that has contributed in large measure to the spirit and character of the American nation itself—continues to bring reality to the ideals of freedom, serving our people with the same dedication that it has always displayed and with an ever greater measure of effectiveness.

Yet it must be acknowledged that the challenge to our educational system is not diminishing, but mounting. For we recognize that our success in meeting unprecedented social, scientific, and physical change, and in directing its forces to positive ends, will be determined essentially by the quality of our schools, colleges, and universities, by the wisdom with which we develop and employ new educational techniques and technologies, and above all, by the compassion and understanding with which we reach out to all people—especially the young—and impart to each the intellectual and occupational enrichment which every American deserves.

After a period of uncertainty in educational matters, we are surer now of how that challenge shall be met. Our country is moving purposefully and effectively to strengthen and develop the great partnership of interests—Federal, State, local and private—through which we can accomplish our educational aims. Our educational leaders are not acting independently but with a new sense of cooperative unity, determined to use all resources, explore all initiatives, and recast the laws, if necessary, in order to serve our national needs. This is not an easy task, and if we are to succeed, we must call upon the assistance and support of all the American people.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the period of October 24 through October 30, 1971 as American Education Week.

I urge all my fellow Americans to make known during this week their appreciation for the truly heroic efforts of our teachers and all our education professionals upon whose humane skills so much of our greatness as a people depends. I ask moreover that we focus upon education as the central task of a democracy and the indispensable ally of liberty. Let the clarity of our vision and the boldness of our actions match the magnitude of our cause.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of October in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

United Nations Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4066 - 85 Stat. 917

Proclamation 4066 of July 9, 1971

United Nations Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year on October 24, the people of America and the world join in the formal observance of a truly global occasion, one that transcends political, cultural, religious, and calendar differences in its promise for all mankind: the anniversary of the United Nations Charter. This fall, as the United Nations completes its twenty-sixth year of service to the world, United Nations Day is an occasion to look back with gratitude and a measure of pride, and to look ahead with determination and hope.

Reviewing the work of the United Nations since 1945, we can see a substantial record of accomplishment in the world body's major areas of endeavor—"to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war . . . and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom," as the Charter states them. The United States will continue in the future, as it has in the past, to support the efforts of the UN in these great tasks.

At the same time, this country and its fellow member countries of the UN must act together to meet the new problems this new decade thrusts upon us. Through the UN, we all share stewardship over the planet Earth: together we face the challenges of coordinating measures to heal and protect the world's fragile ecosystems; of ensuring that the resources of the sea are developed for the benefit of all mankind; of promoting international cooperation in the use of outer space. Through the UN, we all share responsibility for making the human community more humane: together we face the challenges of curbing such vicious international crimes as narcotics trafficking, air piracy, and terrorism against diplomats; of moderating explosive population growth; of protecting the human rights of prisoners of war and refugees.

The roots of American commitment to the United Nations go far deeper than the words of a charter signed at San Francisco or the glass and steel of a headquarters in New York—they spring from the hearts of the American people. With the world in urgent need of a dynamic, effective international organization, it is appropriate for us as a people and as individuals to renew our sense of tough-minded dedication to making the UN work. The President's Commission for the Observance of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the United Nations, under the chairmanship of Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, recently submitted to me its recommendations for measures to increase the effectiveness of the United Nations and of American participation therein. I am giving this useful report close study, and I commend it to the attention of every concerned citizen. Only "we the peoples of the United Nations," who ordained the UN Charter and charged it with man's highest hopes, have the power to make it succeed.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, October 24, 1971, as United Nations Day. I urge the citizens of this Nation to observe that day with community programs which will express realistic understanding and support for the United Nations and its associated organizations.

I also call upon the appropriate officials to encourage citizens' groups and agencies of communication—press, radio, television, and motion pictures—to engage in appropriate observance of United Nations Day this year in cooperation with the United Nations Association of the United States of America and other interested organizations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Wednesday, October 20, 1971

National Day of Prayer - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4087 - 85 Stat. 946

Proclamation 4087 of October 12, 1971

National Day of Prayer, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The great need of our time is that of reconcihation. Nations should be reconciled to nations, races to races, families to families, individuals to individuals. Reconciliation is needed among communities, among ethnic groups, among religious denominations, among social and economic classes, among family members.

The work of reconciliation is too great to be left to man alone. In this work, man needs God, the Supreme Reconciler. The Bible tells us God is the source of reconciliation, in Whom all things are one. Under the fatherhood of God, there flourishes the brotherhood of man.

The world yearns for reconciliation, and for the renewal and the solidarity and the healing that reconciliation brings. This hunger can only be met in its fullness through prayer.

In 1952 the Congress directed the President to set aside a suitable day other than a Sunday each year as a National Day of Prayer. On this day we give special recognition to the Nation's deep religious heritage, and we ask God's help and His blessing.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 20, as National Day of Prayer, 1971. On this day I urge that Americans pray for the fullness of reconciliation among all peoples, and for progress toward ending divisiveness in our own land and in the international community. Let us especially pray for reconciliation in Southeast Asia, and for a speedy return to their loved ones of our long-suffering prisoners of war.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 17, 1971

National Forest Products Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4088 - 85 Stat. 947

Proclamation 4088 of October 13, 1971

National Forest Products Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Today, we are acutely aware of the scarcity of our Nation's vital resources. Some have been lost irretrievably, but others, including products from forests, lend themselves to long-term management.

As our country has grown, it has become increasingly dependent on our forest resources for shelter, furnishings, paper and many other products essential to our way of life. But only now are we beginning to truly appreciate the importance of forests for maintaining a balanced ecology. We must make effective use and management of our forests with due regard for the environment so that we will strengthen our rural economy as well as provide aesthetic and recreational benefits for our people.

The Congress, in order to emphasize the importance of forest resources and forest products to the Nation, has by a joint resolution of September 13, 1960 (74 Stat. 898) designated the seven-day period beginning 36 use 163, on the third Sunday of October in each year as National Forest Products Week, and has requested the President to issue an annual proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week beginning October 17, 1971, as National Forest Products Week, with activities and ceremonies designed to focus our attention on the forest resources with which we have been so abundantly blessed and the ways which these resources can contribute to our material, emotional, and spiritual advantage.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, October 16, 1971

National Newspaperboy Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4085 - 85 Stat. 944

Proclamation 4085 of September 30, 1971

National Newspaperboy Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

This day affords an opportunity to pay tribute to the one million American newspaperboys—who every day travel more than a million miles and distribute more than 62 million newspapers, by their diligence earning some $600 million each year for themselves and, in many cases, as a help to their families.

Besides developing sound work habits, these young businessmen— chiefly between the ages of 12 and 15—learn early how to be contributing members of society, acquiring habits of independence and punctuality and a sense of responsibility. Newspaperboys are seldom delinquents. They are busy, and busy boys have neither the time nor the inclination to get into trouble. They are good citizens.

The roster of former newspaperboys reads like a Who's Who of successful businessmen, statesmen, government officials, performing artists, clergymen, doctors and lawyers. A partial listing includes Ralph Bunche, Tom C. Clark, Bing Crosby, Bob Considine, Richard Cardinal Cushing, Jack Dempsey, Jimmy Durante, Dwight Eisenhower, Ernie Ford, John Glenn, Herbert Hoover, J. Edgar Hoover, Bob Hope, John W. McCormack, Charles Percy, David Sarnoff, Alan Shepard, Red Skelton, Ed Sullivan and John Wayne.

Without newspaperboys, freedom of the press would be more an ideal than a reality. Since the newspaperboy is the actual link between publisher and reader, he gives practical expression to this basic American right.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Saturday, October 16, 1971, as National Newspaperboy Day. I urge the citizens of this Nation to honor American newspaperboys for their significant contribution to the civic, social and economic good of the United States.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-six.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, October 15, 1971

White Cane Safety Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4062 - 85 Stat. 913

Proclamation 4062 of July 1, 1971

White Cane Safety Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In our highly mobile society where city streets are jammed with motor vehicles, a number of safeguards such as traffic lights, "Walk" signs, and hatched crosswalks have been introduced to promote pedestrian safety. In the world of the blind and visually handicapped this same purpose is served by a single small device, often weighing less than half a pound. It is the white cane.

For its owner the white cane is at once a sensor and a guide, and even as it denotes his physical limitation it speaks eloquently for his capability. Training programs instituted throughout the Nation in recent years have developed travel techniques for white cane users that instill self-confidence and a sense of independence. As a result, the white cane has become a symbol of achievement—the achievement of its owner in learning to cope with his environment and to move readily on his way.

But this new mobility cannot be fully realized without the cooperation of fellow pedestrians and the willingness of motorists to give way. An understanding of the potential dangers which city streets hold for blind citizens is commendable, but adequate protection for them can be provided only by strict observance of safety measures.

Our recognition of the white cane and its significance must be immediate; and our reaction equally as rapid. It takes only a second for a motorist to accept second place, but that instant's inhibition may save a life. There is no better time to be our brother's keeper.

To make our people more fully aware of the significance of the white cane, and of the need for motorists to exercise caution and courtesy when approaching persons carrying a white cane, the Congress, by joint resolution, approved October 6, 1964 (78 Stat. 1003), has authorized the President to proclaim October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1971 as White Cane Safety Day.

I call upon all our citizens to join individually in this observance, that blind persons in our society may continue to enjoy the greatest possible measure of personal independence.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of July in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, October 11, 1971

Columbus Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4078 - 85 Stat. 936

Proclamation 4078 of August 31, 1971

Columbus Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Columbus Day, 1971, we honor once more the memory of the great captain whose historic voyages led to the migration of peoples to the New World and brought fresh promises of liberty and freedom to the Old.

In this present age of epic journeys in space, we can appreciate more than ever the great achievements of Christopher Columbus. An intrepid explorer, a supreme navigator, but above all a man of unshakeable faith and courage, this son of Italy sailed in the service of the Spanish crown on a mission that forever broadened man's hopes and horizons.

We take pride in commemorating the vision and determination of Christopher Columbus, and carry forward his spirit of exploration as part of our national heritage.

In tribute to the achievements of Columbus, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 657), as modified by the Act of June 28, 1968 (82 Stat. 250), requested the President to proclaim the second Monday in October of each year as Columbus Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 11, 1971, as Columbus Day; and I invite the people of this Nation to observe that day in schools, churches, and other suitable places with appropriate ceremonies in honor of the great explorer.

I also direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on the appointed day in memory of Christopher Columbus.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand, this 31st day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

General Pulaski's Memorial Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4069 - 85 Stat. 921

Proclamation 4069 of July 26, 1971

General Pulaski's Memorial Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The one hundred and ninety-second anniversary of the death of General Casimir Pulaski on October 11, 1779, in the battle of Savannah, reminds us of the great sacrifice he made for our national independence.

General Pulaski believed that the cause of human freedom was indivisible. He fought against foreign suppression in his native Poland and he joined the struggle for American independence by volunteering in the Continental Army.

On this anniversary of General Pulaski's death, it is appropriate that we note with gratitude his historic contribution—and that of succeeding generations of Americans of Polish origin—to the freedom and progress of this Nation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 11, 1971, as General Pulaski's Memorial Day. I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I also invite the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies honoring the memory of General Pulaski and the contributions which he and others from his homeland have made to our national life.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 26th day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 10, 1971

National School Lunch Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4086 - 85 Stat. 945

Proclamation 4086 of October 9, 1971

National School Lunch Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The National School Lunch Program celebrates its Silver Anniversary this year. For the past quarter century, this important program has made a magnificent contribution to both the education and health of our Nation.

The National School Lunch Program is a product of cooperation among parents, civic groups, and all levels of government. It encourages better nutrition for the schoolchildren of America. In all the participating schools, this program provides free or reduced-price lunches to needy pupils.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of October 9, 1962, designated the week beginning on the second Sunday of October in each year as National School Lunch Week, and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby urge the people of the United States to observe the week of October 10, 1971, as National School Lunch Week with appropriate ceremonies and activities designed to promote good nutrition in our schools.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 9th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Saturday, October 9, 1971

Leif Erikson Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4081 - 85 Stat. 940

Proclamation 4081 of September 21, 1971

Leif Erikson Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Nearly a thousand years ago Leif Erikson, a bold and intrepid Norseman, left familiar waters with a small band of men to face the dangers of the North Atlantic and sail to the shores of this continent. The exploits of Leif Erikson are still in large part shrouded in the mists of history, and only now are we beginning to appreciate fully the magnitude of those explorations.

If the details of Leif Erikson's adventures are still hidden from our view, his courage is not. He and his shipmates are worthy guides to us today, and our journey into the unknown still draws inspiration from them. It is therefore most appropriate that we give national recognition to Leif Erikson, and I am most happy to meet the request of the Congress of the United States, in a joint resolution approved September 2, 1964 (78 Stat. 849), that the President proclaim October 9 in each year as Leif Erikson Day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Saturday, October 9, 1971, as Leif Erikson Day; and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings that day.

I also invite the people of the United States to honor the memory of Leif Erikson on that day by holding appropriate exercises and ceremonies.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Monday, October 4, 1971

Child Health Day - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4082 - 85 Stat. 941

Proclamation 4082 of September 23, 1971

Child Health Day, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The strength and energy of a society may be measured today and predicted for tomorrow by the health of its children. Robust bodies, bright eyes, sharp minds: all of these define the quality of life in this country now and for the future.

Caring for the health of our 70 million citizens under eighteen and the nearly four million babies born each year is not merely a choice for today, but also a duty to tomorrow.

All our children deserve to be free from preventable sickness and handicaps. If they suffer illness or handicap, they should have the best care possible.

We need to insure that parents are helped to bear healthy babies; that infants receive optimal care; that the health of the children is protected and enhanced during the growing years; that abnormalities of development are prevented or ameliorated.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, pursuant to a joint resolution of May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 143), do hereby designate Monday, October 4, 1971, as Child Health Day.

I invite all agencies and organizations interested in child welfare to unite upon that day in such activities as will awaken the people of the Nation to the fundamental necessity of a year-round program for the protection and development of the health of the Nation's children.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Sunday, October 3, 1971

Drug Abuse Prevention Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4080 - 85 Stat. 938

Proclamation 4080 of September 17, 1971

Drug Abuse Prevention Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

"What shall it profit a man," the Bible asks, "if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" It is a question which the menace of drug abuse poses anew to all of us.

What can a nation profit from its abundant good life, if the same technology and material wealth which have yielded that abundance permits millions of its people, particularly its youth, to drift into the chemical modification of mind and mood at grave risk to their health—to their very lives? What can a nation profit from its unparalleled individual freedom, if that liberty becomes license and that license leads to drug dependence which controls the bodies and warps the minds of men, women, children, and even the unborn?

Not so long ago it was easy enough to regard the tragedy of drug abuse as "someone else's problem." But recent years have brought that tragedy home—often very literally—to all Americans. We have learned that "drug abuse" refers not only to the crime-prone heroin addict— though that is the disease at its deadliest, with over 1,000 heroin fatalities annually in New York City. The term also refers to the suburban housewife dependent on tranquilizers or diet pills; to the truck driver over-reliant on pep pills; to the student leaning on amphetamines to help him cram for exams; even to pre-teens sniffing glue.

It has become a problem that touches each of us. Its manifestations are many and varied, but all grow from a common root—psychological and physical needs unmet through legitimate social channels—and all feed on a common ignorance—ignorance of the profound harm the abuser does to himself and society. Drug abuse is nothing less than a life and death matter for countless Americans, and for the moral fiber of this Nation. The drive to meet this threat must command from us our very best—our attention, our energies, our resources and our prayers.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning October 3, 1971, as the second annual Drug Abuse Prevention Week.

I call upon officials of the Federal Government under the leadership of the new Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention, particularly those officials in the Departments of Health, Education and Welfare, Justice, and Defense, to join with educators and the medical profession in intensifying programs to prevent and reduce drug abuse among the young and among all Americans. I urge State and local governments, as well as business and civic groups, to cooperate in such programs and to seek out new methods by which the risks and dangers of drug experimentation can be communicated to the entire Nation. The communications media can render invaluable assistance in this endeavor, and I urge them to do so.

I also encourage the clergy, and all of our moral and spiritual leaders, to make a special effort during this week to take up the problem of drug abuse and to offer those answers of the spirit which alone can fill the void where drug abuse begins.

And I appeal, above all, to those who bear the special trusts of parenthood—that all of us may rededicate ourselves to the well-being of America's youth; and that we may so teach them, so guide them, so reach out to them in understanding and compassion, as to help them avoid the problems that arise from abuse of drugs and to attain the full promise of their maturity.

IN WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

National Employ the Handicapped Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4073 - 85 Stat. 925

Proclamation 4073 of August 13, 1971

National Employ The Handicapped Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From Beethoven, who could not hear but gave the world magnificent symphonies, to Franklin Roosevelt, who could not walk but led America through giant strides in peace and war, history is full of proof that the whole of human potential is far greater than the sum of its physical parts—limbs or organs, or faculties.

It was in recognition of this truth, and of the Hebrew wisdom that "the best alms are . . . to enable a man to dispense with alms," that the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped was established 24 years ago. For nearly a quarter century now, business, government, and the public have worked together as partners in this Committee—to open a newly self-reliant and fulfilling way of life for many thousands of handicapped men and women, and to unlock for the rest of us the benefits of the unique contribution each handicapped person has to make. Through such efforts, American society is learning that no handicap is insurmountable when a man has an unlimited view of himself and an ounce of help from his fellows.

This is a record to be proud of—and to build on still more energetically. Our responsibility to help provide training, jobs, and real opportunity for those who are handicapped as a result of accidents, birth defects, or disease, is a continuing challenge. In addition, we bear today the special trust of redeeming the sacrifices of our disabled veterans of the Vietnam era by giving them the very best in rehabilitation and employment assistance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, in accordance with the joint resolution of Congress approved August 11, 1945, as amended (36 U.S.C. 155), designating the first full week of October of each year as National Employ the Handicapped Week, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week beginning October 3, 1971, for such purpose.

I urge the Nation's Governors, mayors, and all other public officials, as well as leaders in every area of American life, to join with the handicapped themselves in active participation in this observance.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Fire Prevention Week - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4059 - 85 Stat. 910

Proclamation 4059 of June 7, 1971

Fire Prevention Week, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Despite unparalleled technological advances in many areas of our society, uncontrolled fires continue to bring a great deal of tragedy and widespread loss to our Nation. Fires now kill more than 12,000 persons each year and cause annual property losses exceeding $2 billion.

The most shameful aspect of this terrible waste is that it is so unnecessary. Most fires are caused by carelessness, by lack of knowledge, or by hazardous conditions—all of which can be eliminated. But while we all give occasional lip-service to the importance of fire prevention, our deeds too often fail to match our words—and so the loss continues.

But this pattern need not continue. If each of us will only focus his attention on the practical implications of fire prevention in his daily life, a great deal can be done to reduce the destruction caused by fires.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning October 3, 1971, as Fire Prevention Week.

I call upon all citizens to participate in the fire prevention activities of their various governments, of community fire departments, and of the National Fire Protection Association. Every person should be alert to the ways in which he can eliminate fire hazards. Every citizen should learn how to report fires, how to use basic extinguishing agents and firefighting techniques, and how to react when major fires strike his place of work or his residence. The need to rethink all of these matters is especially important as new technologies change our living environments and the nature of the fire risks we encounter.

I also encourage all Federal agencies, in cooperation with the Federal Fire Council, to conduct effective fire prevention programs, including fire exit drills and other means of training employees, in order to help reduce this waste of life and resources which now plagues our Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of June in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Friday, October 1, 1971

Country Music Month - Richard Nixon - Proclamation 4089 - 85 Stat. 948

Proclamation 4089 of October 14, 1971

Country Music Month, 1971

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

From 1923, when Fiddlin' John Carson made the first tremendously successful country recording until today when country sounds can be heard on over 700 radio stations, the popularity of country music has been a notable part of our American culture.

Why is country music so popular? Why is the Grand Ole Opry's audience made up of people who have traveled an estimated average of 450 miles one way to be there?

The answer is simple. Country music speaks to what is tried and true for many Americans. It speaks of the common things shared by all: the happiness of a family, the pains of a broken heart, the mercy of God, and the goodness of man.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RICHARD NIXON, President of the United States of America, ask the people of this Nation to mark the month of October, 1971, with suitable observances as Country Music Month.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON