Friday, October 16, 1981

World Food Day - Ronald Reagan - Proclamation 4875 - 95 Stat. 1844

Proclamation 4875 of October 14, 1981

World Food Day, 1981

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The well-being of all people depends fundamentally upon an adequate and reliable supply of food.

The United States is blessed with abundant land, fertile soil, adequate water, and a favorable climate. Upon this natural base, Americans have erected a sound system of agriculture, founded on the right of private property ownership, the opportunity to earn rewards for honest toil and investment, the freedom to exchange in the marketplace, the availability of essential credit, the application of new scientific discoveries and technologies, and the primacy of the independent family farm. The result has been an unparalleled agricultural bounty, capable of feeding our own people and millions of people around the world.

Today, many nations lack either the natural endowments or the system of incentives to private enterprise that are critical to successful agriculture. Many millions of people, particularly in the Third World, and where government policies have denied land ownership and market incentives to their farmers, are suffering from hunger and malnutrition.

Americans have traditionally been generous in sharing our agricultural abundance and technology with those less fortunate than ourselves. Since the beginning of the Food for Peace program in 1954, more than 387 million tons of American food aid, valued at more than $30 billion, have been provided to the hungry peoples of the world. American agricultural development assistance programs have helped peoples all over the world to improve their food production.

Our efforts to alleviate hunger have complemented those of other members of the international community. We salute particularly the tireless efforts of the Food and Agriculture Organization which, on World Food Day, celebrates thirty-six years of service in the effort to alleviate hunger and malnutrition.

To focus worldwide public attention on the world's food problem, 147 member nations of the Food and Agriculture Organization have unanimously urged individual nations to commemorate October 16 as World Food Day. The Congress of the United States has responded by adopting a Joint Resolution in support of this objective.

On this occasion, let us rededicate ourselves to continuing and strengthening our efforts to assist the people of other lands to work toward the elimination of hunger, to develop strong agricultural bases built upon sound principles, and to engage in mutually beneficial commercial trade between our countries.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, RONALD REAGAN, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 16, 1981, as "World Food Day", and do call upon the people of the United States to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

RONALD REAGAN

Monday, February 16, 1981

National Patriotism Week - Jimmy Carter - Proclamation 4810 - 95 Stat. 1788

Proclamation 4810 of December 23, 1980

National Patriotism Week

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

We are a Nation with many blessings. We have liberties enjoyed by no other Nation on Earth. We have a government admired by many. We have fought hard to preserve our independence and the independence of others, and to gain equal rights and responsibilities for all our citizens. We have much to be thankful for and much to be proud of.

Together we have built a great Nation, a Nation founded on freedom, a Nation forged by patriots. We have made America strong with our strength. We have made America a Nation at peace with our love of peace.

We live in a Nation we all care about deeply. It is important that we continue to care, that we continue to respect ourselves and each other, and that we honor our past and present by reaffirming our commitment to the greatness that is ours.

To recognize our freedoms and honor this great Nation, the Congress, by joint resolution of October 10, 1980 (P.L. 96-421), designated the week commencing with the third Monday in February of 1981 as "National Patriotism Week" and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to commemorate that week with appropriate celebrations and observances.

NOW. THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to observe the week beginning with the third Monday in February 1981 as National Patriotism Week.

I call upon all primary and secondary schools to adopt an appropriate curriculum for that week which should include such elements as the study of the Pledge of Allegiance and the national anthem, national symbols, seals and mottos, and national monuments, heroes, and accomplishments.

I request each Federal agency recognize that week by taking such action as it may deem appropriate.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

JIMMY CARTER

Wednesday, February 11, 1981

National Inventors' Day - Jimmy Carter - Proclamation 4814 - 95 Stat. 1792

Proclamation 4814 of January 14, 1981

National Inventors' Day, 1981

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

As the progress of science and technology is fundamental to the economic and social welfare of our society, so is the patent system essential to the advance of science and technology. This relationship is recognized in the first Article of our Constitution, which empowers the Congress "to promote the progress of science and useful arts" by securing for limited times to inventors an exclusive right to their discoveries.

Established in accordance with this constitutional mandate, our patent system dates back to the very beginning of our Nation. Since George Washington signed the first patent act into law on April 10, 1790, the patent system has encouraged our dramatic progress from a small agrarian Nation to a great technological and industrial world leader. From the cotton gin, telephone, and electric lamp, through the transistor, modem medicines and space vehicles, the history of our creativity, ingenuity and determination is reflected in the records of our patent system.

The incentive offered by patent protection to invent and innovate has created new markets, new industries and more jobs. As a consequence, a strong and reliable patent system is a substantial element in our efforts to develop alternative energy sources, increase our productivity, improve our environment, and solve the technological challenges which will confront us in the future.

In honor of the important role played by inventors in promoting progress in the useful arts, and in recognition of the invaluable contribution of inventors to the welfare of our people, the 96th Congress, by House Joint Resolution 337, has designated February 11, 1981, as "National Inventors' Day." Because February 11 is the birthday of Thomas Alva Edison, this Nation's most prolific inventor, it is an especially appropriate day on which to honor one of our most valuable national resources, the inventive genius of our people.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER. President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon the people of the United States to honor all inventors by observing February 11, 1981, as National Inventors' Day, with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

JIMMY CARTER